Tag Archives: fcp x

1 Sixpence 1 Play

Rode Reel Entry For 2014

Two days of shooting, many days of editing; a collaboration with the assistance of Magda Rakita, who also shot the “Behind The Scenes” film and the talented Neil Patience, from TAP TV, who gave direction on the editing, and our new short documentary film is done.

It’s a story on James Millham who is a pinball enthusiast. A collector and renovator of machines from a pre-Space Invaders era, James says the best thing about his hobby is playing the games.

We shot this film for the Rode Reel 2014 competition. Part of the competition is the People’s Choice prize. If you liked our films, we’d really appreciate your support. Kindly take a few seconds and vote for us; we’d be tremendously grateful!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE FOR “1 Sixpence 1 Play”;

Thank You!!

Preparing a pair of Olympus OM-D E-M1s for the first shot of the day. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Preparing a pair of Olympus OM-D E-M1s for the first shot of the day. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

"Action". 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

“Action”. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

A Rode VideoMic Go on an Olympus OM-D E-M1. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

A Rode VideoMic Go on an Olympus OM-D E-M1. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Testing the Rode NTG3 is connected properly to my Roland R26. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Testing the Rode NTG3 is connected properly to my Roland R26. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Magda Rakita filming the behind the scenes action. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Magda Rakita filming the behind the scenes action. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Gitzo carbon fibre tripod and fluid video head keeping things nice and steady. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Gitzo carbon fibre tripod and fluid video head keeping things nice and steady. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Magda Rakita

Editing the piece on FCP X and a pair of calibrated Eizo CG277 monitors. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Editing the piece on FCP X and a pair of calibrated Eizo CG277 monitors. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Editing the piece on FCP X and a pair of calibrated Eizo CG277 monitors. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Editing the piece on FCP X and a pair of calibrated Eizo CG277 monitors. 1 Sixpence 1 Play pinball film frame grabs. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Crossings

The Journey To Peace And Prosperity

Delighted to have had a second opportunity to collaborate with the talented Carol Allen Storey on a multimedia project commissioned by International Alert. Our first collaboration being Fractured Lives.

This project is on cross-border trading between the Democratic Republic of Congo and its neighbours Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi. They are the centre of this trading in the war-torn Great Lakes region of Africa. This trade between neighbours is a journey to peace and prosperity, being a source of income for more than 45,000 traders and brings stability and economic strength to the region.

The images and video were shot by Carol Allen Storey using a Canon 5D MkII. We then collaborated on editing down the imagery. The chosen photographs were then processed using Aperture, Photoshop, Viveza and Silver Efex Pro. The voice over was then recorded in London using a Rode Lavalier microphone and a Roland R26 audio decoder. Finally, the project was assembled and edited in FCP X.

Top Four For Short Movie

Professional Photographer Of The Year 2013

I am absolutely thrilled to share that one of my short films, Solitude, has made it in to the top four of the shortlist for the Short Movie section of the Professional Photographer of the Year 2013 competition.

My short film joins my news image and street photograph, who are also in the final shortlist of 20. I am absolutely honoured to have three of my works in the finals! Please keep your fingers crossed!

Gunter Sachs Collection at Sotheby’s

An Exclusive Behind The Scenes Look


Behind the scenes as Sotheby’s prepares the Gunter Sachs Collection ahead of the sale on May 22nd and 23rd, 2012. Sotheby’s will be offering close to 300 works of art from the prestigious single owner collection. The sale is estimated to realise £20 million.

Almost 7200 pictures were used in this timelapse. The majority were shot on a pair of Canon 5D MkII cameras specifically set up for shooting this timelapse (with a 16-35mm f2.8L II and 24-105mm f4L), one being triggered by a Pocket Wizard Multimax and the other by the highly configurable IO Shutter running on an iPad 3. A GoPro HD Hero was used for the overhead view timelapse. Reportage images were shot on a Leica M9 and M9-P (using a 50mm Noctilux ASPH, 35mm Summilux ASPH and 28mm Summicron ASPH). The images were all processed in Apple’s Aperture and the video created using Apple’s FCP X.

Huge word of thanks to everyone involved, especially the team from Sotheby’s press office, the lighting crew , technicians and contemporary art experts.

Update: Thrilled to share that the video is published on The Guardian website.

FCP X 10.0.3 Update

Massive Update For FCP X

Apple today (January 31, 2012) announced a rather big update for it’s professional video editing software, FCP X, rather modestly, calling it version 10.0.3. Having seen what the update has, I would have thought it was more like a full digit update, something more along the lines of 10.1.0!

This update made me realise just how far things have come; an email press release from Aple announcing it’s launch and moments later I was on the Mac App Store downloading the updates for the suite; Compressor, Motion and of course, FCP X.

Much has been said about FCP X not being ready for the pro environment and a bandwagon of people not really knowing what this means have joined in. Certainly before this update, editors working within a broadcast house or film company where lots of collaboration, specialist PCIe cards for monitoring on reference broadcast monitors, waveform displays and vectorscopes, multi cam work and so on are part of the workflow, were definitely left wanting.

Version 10.0.3 though goes a long way to answer these needs. After attending a press briefing and demo at Apple’s London HQ, I am very impressed with all that has been done. FCP X was launched in June 2011 and had it’s first update in September of the same year. Now on January 31, 2012, it has had what I consider a huge update and one which should bring it in favour with professional editors. FCP X was pretty much perfect for smaller productions and sole video DSLR shooters already, but with this update, it’s even more capable.

FCP X showing it's Multicam abilities. Photo: © Apple

The biggest news for me personally is that it is now fully Multicam capable, offering up to 64 angles! What’s more, all the cameras used (angles) and external audio, can all be synchronised and lined up in seconds! You can even choose the method of synching; audio, time code, markers or time of day from EXIF. With audio, one can even specify the separate audio clip (one often records audio separately on an audio recorder for best results) to be used as the main audio and the audio from the various cameras is then ignored when you come to edit. There is also a very useful and easy to use Angle Editor to handle the multi cam clips. Genius.

Another huge update is the way plugins are used and this has opened the doors for companies like Red Giant with their superb Magic Bullet Looks and GenArts popular Sapphire Edge to bring out their plugins. This is due to the updating of the FxPlug architecture. Rather surprisingly and very much welcome, updates in the XML has also led to Intelligent Assistance launching 7toX –  a way to transfer your FCP 7 Projects to FCP X! I had to question this several times as it was completely unexpected; to say this is absolutely useful would be putting it mildly!

Another new ability which brought a smile to my face as I realised the creative possibilities is FCP X’s ability to now handle layered Photoshop PSD files. The image is imported as a compound clip and each layer can be edited independently; an easy and fast way of achieving After Effects effects.

FCP X showing an image graded using Red Giant's Magic Bullet Looks. The logo on the bottom left of the viewer shows which filters were used and also has an edit button for opening up the Magic Bullet grading window.

Revisiting the ability to run Broadcast monitors, on non Mac Pro setups that cannot use PCIe cards, there are Thunderbolt boxes from various suppliers which will allow such equipped Macs to also take advantage of this feature, allowing the use of Vectorscopes, Waveform Displays and calibrated specialist Broadcast Monitors.

Red Giant's Magic Bullet Looks on FCP X. A closeup view showing the logo on the bottom left of the viewer which shows which filters were used on this shot of model Vicki Blatchley, which also has the all important edit button for opening up the Magic Bullet grading window.

There are also advanced Chromakey capabilities too which not only work accurately, but surprisingly quickly too.

All in all, this is a huge update and has really elevated FCP X from it’s earlier version 10.0.0 which I reviewed on launch. This update hasn’t only made it even more ideal for the solo film maker and editor, perhaps working with DSLRs, but also brought it much, much closer to being suitable for the professional video editor working in a collaborative studio and having specialist hardware needs.

I for one do not miss FCP 7; roll on FCP X!

The Canon C300 Review

Hands On With The Canon C300


I recently had the pleasure of shooting some video on the new Canon C300 during the C300 event at New Day Pictures. The aim being to show off the camera’s abilities to the guests by supplying footage for editor and colourist Neil Patience to showcase during the day. Our model for the day was the extremely talented and wonderful Vicki Blatchley.

For this video I used the C300 PL, which as it’s name suggests, has the PL mount. During the shoot I used the RED 50mm and 85mm PL lenses. Lighting was by two LED panels with the main light coming from a Kino Flo Diva-Lite. I also had the pleasure of trying out a Miller tripod for the first time and must say, I was rather impressed. All equipment was supplied by New Day Pictures (whom I highly recommend for any video, lighting and accessory rentals).

An ungraded, straight from the C300 stills capture, using Quicktime. The colourspace on the camera was set to EOS for this clip. Image: Edmond Terakopian

Firstly, I need to clarify that the C300 was a pre-production model; having said this, it performed flawlessly. Having never seen, let alone used this camera, after a few minutes of training by Canon’s staff at the event I was ready to shoot. It’s an amazingly simple camera to get to grips with with a clear menu system and extremely clearly market keys dotted around the camera; I found it ergonomically brilliant. A very comfortable camera to hold and use. I was also surprised that it was lighter than I anticipated. For any prolonged handheld use though, I would probably suggest a shoulder rig. All the shots in their short film where done on the Miller tripod. My only disappointment was the microphone holder needed a spacer and so I couldn’t use my trusty Rode NTG3 to test out the camera’s audio abilities.

Vick Blatchley with the EF mount version of the Canon C300. This image is a screengrab from a Canon C300 video file. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

After the first shoot, I was impressed by the camera but was extremely keen to see what the footage looked like on the editing station. Once the files were transcoded from MXF files to Pro Res 422 (using the free Canon XF FCP plugin) we looked at them in FCP 7. Straight out the camera the files were amazingly lush. Full of detail, vivid with accurate colours and pin sharp. The most astonishing aspect was the dynamic range; the camera has it’s widest range at 850 ISO. Not only was this apparent in all the extreme highlight and shadow detail, but equally apparent was just how clean the files looked. This camera is the available light shooters’ dream. Along with it’s built in optical ND filters, shooting to achieve maximum dynamic range in outdoor situations is going to be a walk in the park. In use, the fold out LCD monitor was an absolute joy to use. For handheld use, the built in viewfinder makes things more comfortable, taking on the form factor of a DSLR and providing another point of contact to steady the shot.

Using the Canon C300 at the NDP open day event. Photo ©

For my edit here, I used FCP 7 and the Canon XF plugin to transcode the files and imported them into FCP X for my edit. Initial grading was done in FCP X and finished off using Magic Bullet Mojo. This workflow is a bit annoying (and is the first time I have used FCP7 since upgrading to FCP X) but I’m guessing it’s only a matter of time until there’s full compatibility).

My half day with the camera was an absolute joy. My nervousness at perhaps jumping in at the deep end having to produce footage on a brand new camera were unfounded. I took to it like it was a familiar piece of kit. Judging by how well it performed (running for around six hours solid) and how amazing the footage looks, I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending the C300. The only snag is the £10,000+VAT asking price. If I find my video work increasing as it has done over the last few years, I won’t hesitate in getting one of these, but until then, alas it will remain out of reach. So far, it is the most capable video camera I have worked on, and that includes the RED One and my beloved Canon 5D MkII. In fact, why not rent one from the folks at New Day Pictures and see what the fuss is about!