Tag Archives: art

Unlocked

We’re now FULLY FUNDED!

With huge thanks to all who contributed, especially our main sponsors, Gogar Services and Fujifilm UK.

“UNLOCKED” – a public art project by the Ealing satellite group of London Independent Photography, with the generous support of Ealing Police Station, to stimulate reflection and discussion of the impact of the pandemic on our daily lives and ways forward. This unprecedented project will be on five storeys, on the front of the Police station, providing a canvas, the likes of which have probably never been seen in London before.

A mockup showing Ealing Police Station and the immense size of our project.

We need to ask a favour! This is a huge exhibition project planned for September, as part of BEAT. It’s a project that has taken over a year of planning and discussion.

Matching face mask and outfit to one’s surrounds as the lockdown comes to an end. Knightsbridge, London, UK. June 14, 2020. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Alongside generous support by FujiFilm UK, we’ve applied for an arts grant to help with the funding. As part of that application for the grant, there is a crowdfunding aspect. The grant committee will monitor how many backers we have and from that, gauge interest in the outdoor exhibition and decide to back this unique project or not. We would hugely appreciate your support in making out 5-storey public art project become a reality.

Please back our project and make your pledge, regardless of how large or small: https://www.spacehive.com/ealingunlocked Every individual pledge will bring us closer to getting the grant and bringing this to life.

Kindly share the link or this post far and wide. Thank you.

Alongside the exhibition, we are also planning a talk and workshops given by photographers in the group, about this project, in conjunction with OPEN Ealing.

NHS superhero mural by street artist Lionel Stanhope, pays tribute to NHS workers as they battle COVID 19. Railway bridge in Waterloo. Near empty streets during the lockdown as a result of the COVID 19 pandemic. London, UK. May 30, 2020. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Pressing A Button Is Not Photography

I went to see Salvador in the cinema, in 1986 or 87.


If you haven’t seen it, it’s about photojournalists covering the civil war in Salvador. Highly recommend you watch it! Also, there’s a spoiler coming up, so if you’re going to see it, stop reading, now and return once you’ve seen the film!!

In the film, the main protagonist is a photojournalist played by James Woods. As he’s trying to leave El Salvador to get back to the States, he’s stopped at a check point and roughed up. He was trying to smuggle out films of the civil war and these ‘soldiers’ find the films and rip out the film from the cassette, ruining the pictures.

As this happens, I jumped out of my seat and screamed out ‘NO’! To say my friends were shocked (all non photographers) and the audience most concerned, would be an understatement. My eyes were filled with tears and my heart was pounding. I had been a hobbyist photographer for around two years and this was roughly two years before I started working as a photojournalist. Having dedicated every penny to buying film and every spare minute to reading about and looking at great photography, already brought a deep association with important, quality work.

As photographers, we have a very deep connection to our work. It’s part of us. Its not a job.

The Less Than Thoughtful Client

I had a client a year or two ago, really trying to low ball some work and massively over play the usage, well above the license agreed and paid for. The response during the ensuing discussions, was “its nothing personal, its just work”!

I’ve had clients, trying to con me into giving away copyright, accept very low pay for it, with the almost definite lies of more work in the future (Which never appears. A cheap or dishonest client never steps up and each time one of us accepts such a deal, it affects everyone else after us and for us, the client will never return. The entire industry takes another step towards ruin). Unprofessionalism and dishonesty, never right themselves. Every time we give in, we encourage and enforce this behaviour as being acceptable.

So the concept of a truly passionate, dedicated creative professional looking at their calling in life, be it photography, film making, music, poetry, writing and so on, being ‘just a job’, goes to show extreme ignorance in understanding what we do, how we think and how we are.

Long term partnerships nurture amazing work, which in turn makes the person booking the creative work look great and retain their client or job. Happy boss / client, happy middle person and happy creative.

The sad fact that more and more, only cutting corners seems to matter, even be a priority and quality of work is no longer an issue for these types of people, means that society’s appreciation of quality is diminishing. Quality and thought can be in a great advert. It can be an Instagram campaign. A Facebook sponsored post. A point of sale poster in a shop. The client pays, the middle person takes the biggest cut, the actual creative making the work, gets cheated.

A few years ago, I had a huge multi-national company trying to get me to work for free, as they felt paying for my vision, creativity, experience, time and skill, would pollute the purity of the work and this brand only wanted to work with truly passionate people who believe in the brand. My response to this person was in the form of a compliment; praising that they seemed extremely passionate and dedicated, so I was certain they must be working for free. Needless to say, this was met with astonished silence.

Just because someone can push a button and accepts being conned, does not make them a pianist, a writer or a photographer. No one who truly cares for their work, will disrespect their own creation and devalue it.

Some Advice For Young Photographers

If you’re new to the world of photography, my first piece of advice is to research and never agree to a fee or license on the spot. Most dishonest clients will try the line that they’re right up against the deadline etc. This is a pressurising technique. Promise of more work as there’s a low budget, is also a trick. When faced with such things, I always promise to do an amazing deal on the fifth booking. This type of client never comes back for a second booking, let alone a fifth, as they are purely out to take advantage.

As for rates and what to charge, there are various licensing calculators, like fotoQuote or the AOP’s online usage calculator. These are complied from prices paid, for similar work and an agreement between clients and photographers. These are industry standard rates. You can use these as a basis to either quote directly from, or to negotiate near to figures. If your skill and work is unique, you can negotiate upwards, for example. There are also several photographer’s groups online, where advice can be garnered before making an agreement.

Copyright. This is yours by law. Its not the client’s. If a client wants a buyout, this can be arranged and negotiated. Never give this away for free. Ever.

Value your work and that of the industry.

Love Your Job Print, Edition Of 25 Released

One of my favourite street photographs, is now available as an edition of 25. Even before publicising the edition, 3 prints have already been sold, so at the time of writing, there are 22 prints left. Perhaps the perfect Christmas treat or gift?

A heavy downpour of rain soaks a businessman, as he passes an illuminated advertising sign stating “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The edition is an archival Giclée, gallery quality print. The photograph is printed on A3 (approx 11-3/4” x 16-1/2” or 297mm x 420mm) with a white border, on Hahnemüehle Photo Rag Bright White. 310 gsm on 100% cotton art paper. Signed on the back, name on the front left, edition numbered on the front, along with my embossing on the right side. Each print will also come with a certificate of authenticity.

The price of each print is £400 (which includes VAT) plus shipping. Each print will be shipped in a sturdy tube. As the edition gets sold out, it’s customary for the price to rise near the end of the edition, so it’s wiser to invest earlier on. Please contact me via the Contact page to make arrangements.

For me, the image perfectly encapsulates modern life in the city. The duality of striving for happiness and survival, with far too many working in jobs they don’t love, to make ends meet. That constant struggle.

The image was made as I was running to the car park. As soon as I saw the light from the advertising hoarding, it made me stop. The way it was lighting the rain and the wet pavement caught my eye. It was only a moment later that I read the message. The problem though, was that the digital advertising was a constant slideshow. None of the other adverts were as bright or simple; they were in fact colourful and messy, and as a light source didn’t work as they were much dimmer.

I must have waited for around 20 minutes. Suddenly from the right hand side, a businessman in a raincoat, holding a briefcase, rushed past. It was so quick, I managed to shoot two frames on my Leica. As luck would have it, the timing of the businessman coincided with the “Love Your Job” slide showing on the advertising board.

I love my job 😉

The photograph has been recognised by various awards and curators over the years, including being a runner-up in the Driven Creativity shortlist and exhibited in London, Paris & Berlin. It was a finalist in Travel Photographer Of The Year too. It was exhibited in The Press Photographers’ Year in the National Theatre, as well as the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition in London. It was commended by the judges of the Fotoura International Street Photography Awards as well as used as a double page spread in AP Magazine’s ‘Tribute To Leica’ issue. It also won the Life At Work category of the British Life Photography Awards. It was judged as Professional Photographer of the Year’s winner in the Street Photography category. It also made The Huffington Post Pictures of the Year in 2011.

To purchase your print, please use the CONTACT page to get in touch.

Photo Insight; Amateur Photographer magazine, July 2014.

8 Day To Go! Help Us, Help MSF

Eyewitness MSF Fundraising Photographic Print Auction

We, at Eyewitness have organised a print auction of 66 prints by 42 photographers worldwide, to raise funds for Médecins Sans Frontières’s (MSF) coronavirus crisis appeal.

Eyewitness MSF Charity Photographic Print Auction Audio Slideshow from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

To see the catalogue of all the images, please visit Bamfords Auctions.

Photographers featured (in order) are: Shane Balkowitsch (USA), Fabrizia Costa (UK), Steven Neeson (UK), Paul Lowe (UK), Ian Berry (UK), Tom Stoddart (UK), John Downing (UK), Crispin Rodwell (Rep of Ireland), Tim Page (Australia), Yoshie Nishikawa (Italy/Japan), Mark Harrison (UK), Jason Bell (UK/USA), Clive Arrowsmith (UK), Rob Heyman (Australia), Edmond Terakopian (UK), Johnson Wee (Malaysia), Stuart Wood (UK), Ross Grieve (UK), Paul Sanders (UK) and Greg Finck (France). 

Travel Photographer Of The Year

Inspirational Journeys 11

A joy to receive the Travel Photographer Of The Year (Inspirational Journeys 11) book today. I was fortunate enough to have my image selected by the judges for a ‘Special Mention’ and was included in the very popular outdoor exhibition, by the banks of the River Thames outside City Hall.

The Travel Photographer Of The Year, Inspirational Journeys 11 book, alongside my Lumix G9 and Leica DG 50-200mm, with which I made the award winning photograph. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

My image was shot in the Tate Modern, using my Lumix G9 and the amazing Leica DG 50-200mm f2.8-4.0. The image was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment finished in Exposure X5.

The Travel Photographer Of The Year, Inspirational Journeys 11 book, alongside my Lumix G9 and Leica DG 50-200mm, with which I made the award winning photograph. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian
The Travel Photographer Of The Year, Inspirational Journeys 11 book. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

On A Limited Time Offer; English Countryside Flowers

My English Countryside Flowers photograph is available as a 50″x40″ stretched canvas print for a promotional price, 35% off, on a limited run of 15, for four days (ends September 10th).

English Countryside Flowers. West Sussex, UK. May 13, 2019. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

To place an order, please visit: https://fineartamerica.com/weeklypromotion.html?promotionid=257062

The image was made in West Sussex, England, in a field of wild flowers, as the sun was beginning to set. Shot on a Lumix S1R, with a Lumix S Pro 50mm f1.4 lens.