Shortlisted For 2020 British Photography Awards

Two Images In The Final Shortlist

I’m thrilled to share that the judges of the British Photography Awards have kindly shortlisted two of my photographs for the 2020 awards. My congratulations to all the finalists and also to the judges for their hard work.

Alongside the judges ruling, there is a people’s choice award too, so voting is open to the public. If you like either (or both!) of my images, kindly press the “VOTE” button by the right hand side of each image. It’s a simple click and no registration is needed.

Category-Fashion: Fashion designer Joshua Kane

Fashion designer and independent British luxury brand, Joshua Kane, in his flagship store at 68 Great Portland Street, London, UK. July 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The portrait of fashion visionary Joshua Kane was shot as part of the Panasonic Lumix international launch campaign for the new Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens and made using my Lumix S1R and a preproduction lens. The raw file was as always processed in Adobe Lightroom.

To VOTE for the image, kindly go to: https://www.britishphotographyawards.org/2020-Shortlist/Fashion/Fashion-designer-Joshua-Kane/802e1a46-1f05-4864-89f2-92631de47dbb

Category – Documentary: Repairs On The Giant Tortoise

Senior Conservator Arianna Bernucci stabilises the shell of a giant tortoise, a Type Specimen (used as a reference specimen), Testudo Porteri from the Galápagos Islands, 1903, using Japanese tissue paper. Conservation Centre, fossil preparation studio. Behind the scenes at the Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UK. February 22, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The image of Senior Conservator Arianna Bernucci working on the shell of a giant tortoise, was made using my Lumix S1 and Lumix S Pro 50mm f1.4 lens. The raw image was processed in Lightroom and finished in Exposure Software’s Exposure X5.

To VOTE for the image, kindly go to: https://www.britishphotographyawards.org/2020-Shortlist/Documentary/Repairs-On-The-Giant-Tortoise/4a104917-ce1d-411e-9188-c8e2a28fd809

It’s astonishing to hear from the organisers that “In 2019 our audience potential topped 840 million people worldwide. This year we hope to greatly exceed this and showcase the creativity and dynamism of British photography to the world”. The competition’s results will be announced in 2020 at a black tie gala at The Savoy in Central London.

Winning Images at the 14th Annual Black & White Spider Awards

Thrilled to share that several of my images have been kindly recognised and awarded by the judges of the 2019 Black & White Spider Awards.

Honorable Mention in Advertising | The First Porsche
Honorable Mention in Photojournalism | No To Brexit
Nominee in People | Birdman
Nominee in People | The Rose
Nominee in Silhouette | The First Ever Porsche

Interestingly, all of the photographs were shot using my Panasonic Lumix S1, a camera I got at the start of the year, and one that has left me so impressed that I’ve shot most of my work using it (and it’s bigger brother, the higher resolution S1R). The lenses used were the Lumix S 24-105mm f4.0 and the Lumix S-Pro 50mm f1.4.

Honorable Mention in Advertising | The First Porsche 

A 1939 Porsche Type 64. The aluminium race car was built at Reutter Works and is the oldest car ever to wear the Porsche badge (and is the only surviving 1939 Porsche Type 64, from the three which were originally built. Chassis No: 38/41, Engine No: 38/43). Sotheby’s St. George Street Gallery, London, UK. May 21, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Honorable Mention in Photojournalism | No To Brexit 

It’s Their Future. Put It To The People March. Official figures put the numbers at the anti Brexit march at over one million. The demonstration, marched in central London calling for another EU referendum. The demo ends in Parliament Square. London, UK. March 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Nominee in People | Birdman

A man is surrounded by birds as he feeds the pigeons along the seafront. Daily life, Barcelona, Spain. January 28, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian *NB Test shot with a prototype Lumix S1*

Nominee in People | The Rose

A couple embrace on the beach. Daily life, Barcelona, Spain. January 27, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian *NB Test shot with a prototype Lumix S1*

Nominee in Silhouette | The First Ever Porsche 

A 1939 Porsche Type 64. The aluminium race car was built at Reutter Works and is the oldest car ever to wear the Porsche badge (and is the only surviving 1939 Porsche Type 64, from the three which were originally built. Chassis No: 38/41, Engine No: 38/43). Sotheby’s St. George Street Gallery, London, UK. May 21, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The international jury comprised of representatives from Musee de l’Elysee, Lausanne; The Guardian, London; Contrasto Galleria, Milan; Travel/Discovery Channel, New York; Harper’s Bazaar, UK; Portuguese Center of Photography, Porto; Aeroplastics Contemporary, Brussels; Silvan Faessler Fine Art, Zurich; ADK Creative One Inc., Tokyo; Galerie Hubert Winter, Vienna; Conny Dietzschold Galleries, Sydney; and Pereira O’Dell in New York judged the 6,418 entries, received from 73 countries. Many thanks to the jury for their hard work and many congratulations to all who had their work recognised.

The raw files were processed in Adobe Lightroom Classic and the monochrome treatment finished off in either Nik Collection’s Silver Efex Pro or Exposure Software’s Exposure X4.

Home

An Exhibition By Ealing London Independent Photography

HOME can mean different things to each of us. It can be a familiar place to rest after a long day. It can be a refuge. It may be more transient. ? Is it the comfort of familiar spaces? Or a place to figuratively lay your hat? Is your home in fact a result of not having a home?  

A diverse group of photographers from the Ealing branch of London Independent Photography responds to the theme, creating creative, thought provoking photographs, exploring the far reaching meaning of this simple word. Home.

The group exhibition is part of BEAT – the Borough of Ealing Art trail 2019. See below for details. Rickyard in Walpole Park. Hope you can swing by and look through a fascinating set of imagery.

The Rickyard, Walpole Park, Ealing, London W5 5BS. From 6th – 15th September, 2019.

Opening times:

Fri 6th, 12 – 7pm; Sat 7th & Sun 8th, 12 – 6pm
Mon 9th to Thurs 12th, 12 – 5pm; Fri 13th, 12 -7pm; Sat 14th & Sun 15th, 12 – 6pm

The International Homeless Epidemic; A homeless man sleeps on the pavement, seemingly passed out, as a can of beer stands next to him with a stream of liquid flowing away. Daily life, Gothic Quarter (Barri Gotic), Barcelona, Spain. February 03, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

My image was shot earlier this year on a pre-production Panasonic Lumix S1 and Lumix S 24-105mm lens. The raw file was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment finished in DxO Nik Collection, Silver Efex Pro.

Prints From The Online Gallery

Many thanks to our friends at Pixelrights for their continued support for the group. We have a gallery website where images from the exhibition can be viewed and prints are available to purchase.

The Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 Lens Hands On Preview

Seven Weeks With The Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 (Pre-Production) Lens

Pre-production Panasonic Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 L-Mount Full-Frame Lens, attached to a Lumix S1 camera. London, UK. August 27, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A self portrait, showing a pre-production Panasonic Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 L-Mount full-frame lens, mounted on a Lumix S1 and a Uniqball ball head. London, UK. August 25, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

“Mmmmm, this is going to be special”. This was what I said to myself as soon as I looked at the the very first test frame I shot with the lens on my Lumix S1R. Followed by, “Its so sharp!”. This was a very good way to start shooting with a brand new lens. In fact, a pre-production model at that, with early, pre-production firmware.

Eunsley Park, award-winning British, South Korean violinist, with a Lorenzo Storioni violin, from the 1800s (from the Beare’s International Violin Society). Walkway by a construction site, Ealing, London, UK. July 29, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Eunsley Park, award-winning British, South Korean violinist, with a Lorenzo Storioni violin, from the 1800s (from the Beare’s International Violin Society). Walkway by a construction site, Ealing, London, UK. July 29, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

I felt rather honoured when Panasonic Lumix UK got in touch to see if I’d like to test out the unreleased S Pro 24-70mm f2.8, ahead of it’s global launch on August 28th, 2019, which was around 1.5 months away. Unboxing the generic brown box, cutting away the bubble wrap, revealed the new lens. I found out the lens had been carried by hand, all the way from Japan! I got out some black tape, covered up all the markings and began shooting.

Entertainer and clown Christina Petre. Armenian Summer Festival, North Acton Playing Fields, Eastfields Road, London, UK. July 14, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It’s a bit of a special feeling knowing only a handful of people globally have seen the lens and I’ve been asked to test it and make images with it to be possibly used for the global launch. It’s also quite stressful, knowing photographs have to be made to not only showcase, but live up to every aspect of what was already proving to be a spectacularly good lens.

Portrait of Stephen Unwin (theatre and opera director, writer and teacher) at home. London, UK. July 15, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

One of the characteristics that hit me as I begun shooting more and more, was that this wasn’t just a sharp lens, but it had something special. Pure clinical sharpness is ok for forensic type photography, but for being creative, for conveying mood, for sharing a story, one also needs gentleness, subtlety and grace. The rendering from this lens has all of that.

Jan Hellebrand assembles a mechanical clock after a full dissasembly and service. The Clock Gallery, Pitshanger Lane, Ealing, London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Generally, a 24-70mm f2.8, is a bread and butter lens; pretty much everyone will have one in their bag and it’s the standard professional zoom. Versatile, useful and a safe choice. What I found special though, was this wasn’t just a bread and butter lens. Where one may have a standard zoom for safety, one would also have a special prime with nicer rendering, for making those special portraits or creative shots.

In Armenian mythology, the pomegranate is celebrated as a symbol of life and is also believed to keep us safe from evil spirits. It has religious connotations to Christianity and is seen as the blood of Christ. The mythology of ancient Greece regarded this fruit as the symbol of life, marriage and rebirth. The fruit is also used as a holy symbol and respected in zoroastrian worshipping ceremonies and rituals.The pomegranate symbolises the soul’s immortality and the perfection of nature for Zoroastrians. For Muslims, the pomegranate is also a symbol of beauty, it is said to give beauty to those who eat it. Prophet Mohammed has advised pregnant women to eat pomegranates if they wanted beautiful children. Placement of pomegranate trees in the gardens of Eden, brings meaning for Muslims, who as a result believe that it is a holy tree. The Jewish mysticism called Kabbala reveres the pomegranate in many of its rituals. In modern Turkey today, many families throw a pomegranate on the floor and “crack” it on the New Year’s Eve to have a plentiful new year. Pomegranate still life. London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Well, the S 24-70mm f2.8 has all of that. It’s truly special to have all these qualities wrapped up in one lens. Versatility and speed, but also beautiful rendering, colour, contrast, detail and well, a bit of poetry too. I found it captured light and colour beautifully and rendered a nicely soft background in out of focus areas. As much as I hate talking about this and using the word bokeh, it does have beautiful bokeh! (I need to add my dislike is purely based on people who only care about bokeh and nothing else, especially not the craft of photography).

A Piccadilly Ballerina Jonquil timepiece, modelled by Mona Ali. British luxury timepiece creator Backes & Strauss (founded in 1789). 21-22 Grosvenor Street, Mayfair, London, UK. July 17, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It is chunky though. I felt the same way as when I first picked up the S Pro 50mm f1.4. Although I wished all of the S Series lenses could be a little smaller, just as with the S 50mm, as soon as I started shooting with the S 24-70mm, it justified it’s size and won a place in my camera bag. In fact, I pretty much didn’t shoot with anything else and seven weeks on, it’s always been mounted on either my S1 or S1R.

The horses are cooled down with water after the match. King Power Gold Cup polo match between Emlor and Murus Sanctus. Cowdray Park Polo Club, Ambersham & Brooks Field Grounds, Selham, West Sussex. July 10, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It just produces beautiful images and no matter what type of subject I point it at, it does as I ask and produces what I want. Fast to react and precise in rendering.

Fashion designer and independent British luxury brand, Joshua Kane, in his flagship store at 68 Great Portland Street, London, UK. July 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Super fast and silent AF, outstanding build quality and stunning optics. I have a feeling the scientific types at DxO Labs are going to enjoy putting this through their rigorous tests.

Hans Staartjes with his hand built indoor free flight rubber powered model airplane, known as an “F1D” class (internationally recognised flight duration competitions since the 1960’s). The model has a wing span of 55cm and weigh 1.4 grams. The model is balsa reinforced by very fine boron filaments and covered in the lightest film available, called OS film. London, UK. July 05, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
A portrait of German television host Max (Dieter) Moor. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

So please don’t read this small post as a review; it really is a quick preview. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. Keep in mind though that this is a pre-production lens with early, non final firmware and so is definitely a pre-release lens. Yet, it helped make these images with grace. I can’t wait to get my hands on the final thing! If you have an L Mount camera, I suggest you try it too!

Italian Alpine (Mountain Troop) soldiers at the top of Kronplatz mountain. Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Traditional Armenian Sunday Worship conducted by Rev. Shnork Bagdassarian. St Sarkis Armenian Apostolic church (the Grade II listed building was constructed in 1922 and is the only church in England to have been built in the traditional Armenian style). Iverna Gardens, Kensington, London, UK. July 07, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

I’ll be sharing some pictures in the coming weeks on my Instagram @terakopian.

More S Pro 24-70mm Photographs

You can also find two albums of photographs on my Flickr:

Photographs Shot On The New Panasonic Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 Lens

Panasonic Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 Lens Product Shots and Comparison

The Queen Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace, London, UK. July 07, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Dancers from the London based Akhtamar Dance Group. Armenian Summer Festival, North Acton Playing Fields, Eastfields Road, London, UK. July 14, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
A lady photographs her friend using a smartphone. Upper deck of the Snog frozen yoghurt bus. South Bank, London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Summer Flowers. Ealing Common, London, UK. July 11, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Having just watched the Livestream from Hollywood, launching the Lumix S1H and S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens, thrilled to see one of my images shown by Yosuke Yamane-san, the head of imaging at Panasonic.

A photograph by Edmond Terakopian projected during the Lumix global launch event for the Lumix S1H and S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens. Dolby Vine Theatre, Hollywood, LA, CA, USA. August 27, 2019. Video Grab: ©Panasonic

RAF Photography Competition 2019

Judging The RAF Photographers’ Best Images

It’s been an absolute honour and a positively stress filled joy, to have been one of the three judges in the RAF‘s annual competition.

Image of The Year; WINNER: Concorde – The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows perform Concorde over the deep blue sea of Greece. On the 21st May, Red 10 and Circus 10 photo chased a full display at the Hotel Datum in glorious afternoon sunshine, whilst deployed on Ex SPRINGHAWK 19 in Greece where they refine the display ready for the Public Display Authority (PDA). Photo: Cpl Ash Keates – RAFAT

The Royal Airforce has trained some phenomenal photojournalists and I would say the top of that list would be Don McCullin, who signed up to National Service in the RAF as a photographic assistant. To be invited back for the second year to judge the work of McCullin’s contemporaries is indeed a special treat.

One certain way of knowing how high the level of photography is in any competition is by looking at how much discussion, heated debate and heart breaking compromise occurs between judges.

Photographer of the Year; WINNER & Image of The Year; HIGHLY COMMENDED: Stargazer – A CH-47 Chinook helicopter rests at night during a training mission in the Arizona desert. The Chinook was being used at a FARP (Forward Arming Refuelling Point) to refuel USMC helicopters whilst deployed at the Marine Corps Air Base, in Yuma, Arizona, USA to take part in the twice yearly training and development programme known as WTI (Weapons and Tactics Instructor). Photo: Cpl Tim Laurence – ACSSU, RAF Halton

Well, I can say that this year, even more so than last year, the debates were passionate. Its also worth noting that Highly Commended places were optionally awarded by the judges, purely because the level of the work was so high and the competition was so close.

Image of The Year; HIGHLY COMMENDED: Split break – Two new XXV(F) Squadron take flight over North Wales. A flight that saw Hawks from both IV(R) Squadron and XXV(F) Squadron, following the Squadrons has split to form 2 squadrons, to meet demands in the UK Military Flying Training System (UK MFTS) and the increase in demand for fast jet pilots. Photo: SAC Chris Thompson-Watts – Photo ACSSU

Judging of the 13 different categories of the RAF Photographer Of The Year Competition 2019 took place at the RAF Museum, in London. Jim Hedge (Picture Editor at the Guardian), Martin Keene (Press Association Group Picture Editor) and myself spent a day looking through hundreds and hundreds of prints. For the video category, we had access to view the entries beforehand and then spent around an hour together viewing our favourites and discussing the merits of our chosen favourites.

Image of The Year; HIGHLY COMMENDED: Goose – The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team; The Red Arrows, deployed on Ex SPRINGHAWK 19, perform Goose on a still morning whilst fisherman watch on from their boat at Chalkoutsi, Greece. Photo: Cpl Ash Keates – RAFAT

The Image Of The Year (Category L) was a great illustration of the skill of the RAF’s photographers. The winning image by Cpl Ash Keates, titled Concorde, grabbed my attention the second I saw it after entering the judging hall and it stayed with me. I later found it had had the same effect on one of my fellow judges too. A strong sense of composition, colour, technical perfection married to the subtlety of capturing the shadows left by the Red Arrows on the water, raised it from a great picture to a winning photograph.

The four images I’ve shared here show an absolute mastery of craft; bringing not only fast reflexes, but an art of composition, a deep aesthetic sensibility and layers of subtlety. Our task was to choose just one winner, but the work was so good that we decided to also award six Highly Commended places too.

Photographer of the Year; WINNER: Centurions of The Night – A pair of RAF Typhoons wait to taxi out and depart from RAF Akrotiri on an Op SHADER night mission. RAF Typhoons are now upgraded and equipped with a new ‘Centurion’ weapon configuration that now includes Brimstone missiles. Photo: Cpl Tim Laurence – ACSSU, RAF Halton

The Photographer of the Year (Category K) was won by a superb portfolio of six images by Cpl Tim Laurence (ACSSU, RAF Halton). Another showcase of mastery of craft, with a varied set of images which worked extremely well together, yet each in their own right shone. Another extremely difficult category to judge with much debate and discussion as the level of work was so high. Cpl Laurence also had his phenomenal photograph titled Stargazer (of a Chinook at night) highly commended in the Image Of The Year category.

Photographer of the Year; WINNER: Centurion Sundown Ð A RAF Eurofighter Typhoon rests on the pan at RAF Akrotiri Airfield, Cyprus at sunset. Deployed to RAF Akrotiri as part of 903EAW the jets deploy daily in support of Coalition troops on the ground in the Middle East offering valuable target acquisition and fast air support with deadly precision in the fight against Daesh. Photo: Cpl Tim Laurence – ACSSU, RAF Halton
Photographer of the Year; WINNER: Heavy Metal – This image shows a Weapon Systems Operator (WSOP) from 27 Squadron, RAF Odiham, looking out of the front crewmanÕs door of his CH-47 Chinook as the setting sun disappears at MCAS Yuma, Arizona and marks the beginning of a night time training sortie. Photo: Cpl Tim Laurence – ACSSU, RAF Halton

First place in the Video (Category D) section goes to SAC Ed Wright (Photo ACSSU) for Fortune Favours the Bold. Finland will be the host nation of Bold Quest 19.1 held in April-May 2019. Bold Quest 19.1 is a multinational joint fires interoperability demonstration and assessment event sponsored and facilitated by the United States Joint Staff.

The People’s Choice-Vote Now!

During the judging process, these nine images made it to our People’s Choice board. Have a look at the stunning photographs and make your vote (It’s a quick, one click vote).

Behind The Scenes

It really is a joy talking about great images, championing favourites and being treated to so many great images. Many congratulations on all the winners, all who were highly commended and my best wishes to all who entered their fantastic work. I’ve only shared some of the winners here, but do pop by the RAF Photographers’ Instagram to see more work. You can also find them on Facebook.

Judging the 13 different categories of the RAF Photographer Of The Year Competition 2019. (L-R) Jim Hedge (Picture Editor at the Guardian), Edmond Terakopian (photojournalist) and Martin Keene (Press Association Group Picture Editor). RAF Museum, Hendon, London, UK. August 20, 2019. Photo: SAC AMY LUPTON / RAF
Judging the 13 different categories of the RAF Photographer Of The Year Competition 2019. Edmond Terakopian (photojournalist) looks through some of the entries. RAF Museum, Hendon, London, UK. August 20, 2019. Photo: SAC AMY LUPTON / RAF

Here’s a video prepared by the RAF, part of which is a behind the scenes look to the work done by their photographers and also gives a glimpse of the judges at work.

Reaching Photographic Heights

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy.

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The highs and lows of photography? Well, in this case, the very highest of highs of photography, in the highest museum dedicated to mountain photography, at 2275m. Part exhibition venue, part museum, part architectural magnificence and part a fabulous place to eat, Lumen was for me an illuminating visit to a very unique place. 

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Uniquely, one can visit the four floors, exploring 1800 square meters of phenomenal mountain photography, then step outside and try one’s own hand at photographing the splendid views from Kronplatz mountain, situated in the Pustertal Valley, South Tyrol, Italy. The sights of The Dolomites and the Alps is breathtaking.

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Not only layered landscapes but also some action shots of free falling paragliders, mountain bikers or the more sedate pace of hikers exploring the trails or the beautiful mountain flowers. I have to say that my nine hours didn’t feel enough as I wanted to continue taking in all that was on show at the museum and also make my own photographs around the magnificent venue and the views and opportunities for imagery. 

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Lumen is possibly the most inspiring museum I’ve been to. It’s been thoroughly thought out, beautifully designed and curated with taste and aesthetic depth. As an outsider to the world of mountain photography, my mind was opened when presented with so many aspects of imagery about the subject. Mountaineers, climbing shots, shots from the summit, images of record, all shot in a documentary way, showing the amazing feats, but also beautifully creative images of mountains in the landscape. It’s fascinating to see how mountains are perceived by different nationalities or beliefs; places of freedom and leisure, holy places, symbols of ideology. Nature, culture and symbolism.

A montage of various summits. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Even the elevator has been creatively designed, with a glass back looking at a giant, four floor Lightbox, showing a journey from the valley to the peak of the mountain. Beautifully conceived and executed. Get in, press level three and start from the top. One Starts the journey by looking at the work of the pioneers in mountain photography. There is a section dedicated to the changes in photographic technology, starting with the earliest of cameras from 1840 and moving through the eras to digital. Many nowadays would have ever seen a darkroom, so I was thrilled to see a darkroom set up, along with three trays showing the steps in the development of a print, all done digitally, so no chemical stains or scents in this darkroom, just knowledge and experience.

A stereoscopica stereo camera in the Lumiére display. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Along with the more traditional prints, there is a lot of innovation throughout the museum. Everything from Virtual Reality headsets, allowing the visitor to experience the mountain, through to an action packed audio visual room showing the thrills of the sport of climbing. 

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

One of the most interesting rooms to explore in a fully immersive way, was the Speigelsaal with its mirror walls, floor and ceiling. One huge wall was a screen showing images of mountains, which were then infinitely reflected through the room.

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

To add to the fascination, visitors walking around can see each other, or catch their own reflection, in a floating through time and space kind of way, defying gravity and hovering over a continuous montage of scenes. For those into selfies (and yes, I did take several!), this may just be the best location on the planet to do a self portrait.

The Shutter. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
The Shutter. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
The Shutter. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The “Shutter” is a particularly impressive concept; a huge room with a floor to ceiling, circular focal plane type shutter which can be open or closed and therefore can be used as a projector screen when closed. When open, it’s a beautiful place to view the nearby mountain ranges and landscape from. A shutter through which to view and with which, to project what was already captured.

Ambrotype photographer Kurt Moser with his vintage large format Multilth Camera (USA) made in 1907, with a Charles Beseler Company 18” f3.6 lens. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The artist in residence up to December 2019 is the supremely talented and fascinating photographer Kurt Moser, who along with project leader Barbara Holzknecht, forms Lightcatcher. There is a room dedicated to his wonderful ambrotype portraits, a film showing his workflow with this amazing technique as well as a “tiny” large format camera.

Ambrotype photographer Kurt Moser, photographed using the rear focusing screen of his vintage large format Multilth Camera (USA) made in 1907, with a Charles Beseler Company 18” f3.6 lens. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I say tiny as Kurt’s smallest regular use camera is a vintage large format Multilith Camera (USA) made in 1907, with a Charles Beseler Company 18” f3.6 lens, which when fully extended measures two meters. He calls this camera “Baby” and it can create ambrotypes up to 50x60cm.

The vintage large format Multilith Camera (USA) made in 1907, with a Charles Beseler Company 18” f3.6 lens, seat and head clamp which will be used to make an ambrotype portrait. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The three meter “Lady in Red”, is the new camera which was purpose-built for Moser’s ongoing project on the Dolomites, following concern of putting the vintage baby camera through gruelling trips in the mountains. This supports both the square 90×90 cm and horizontal 90×55 cm formats. His next camera will be built into a vintage, six wheeled Russian military truck. Using an extremely rare Apo Nikkor 1780 mm and Leitz Epis 1000mm f3.5 lens, for photographing landscape images on black glass.

Photographer Kurt Moser positions German television host Max (Dieter) Moor into position for his ambrotype portrait, for which he must stay completely still during the nine second exposure. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Kurt Moser says of the residency, “the artist in residence program of the Lumen Museum is very important for us. It is a relevant step on our way to Berlin where in 2021 we will have our big Unesco Dolomites Solo Exhibition at the Museum of Photography. The Lumen is our first exhibition and gives us the opportunity to make the ambrotype and its very special visual language accessible to a large audience. We also have videos in the Lumen which explain the procedure of ambrotypes to visitors, sharing this ancient technique. Of course our theme, the Unesco Dolomites, fits perfectly into the concept of the museum too!”

Photographer Kurt Moser begins the exposure by removing the lens cap as German television host Max (Dieter) Moor sits in position for his ambrotype portrait, for which he must stay completely still during the nine second exposure. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

During the inauguration event, Kurt Moser did a live demonstration with “Baby”, making an ambrotype portrait of television presenter Max Moor. For the gathered crowds, the portrait was posed and lit, with the camera then being focused. After this point, the sitter had to remain completely still whilst the team rushed to their mobile darkroom to coat the glass plate with a collodion solution, which is then rendered photosensitive in a silver bath.

Photographer Kurt Moser and project leader Barbara Holzknecht take the glass plate to their mobile darkroom (a converted van) for processing. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The prepared plate has a shelf life of only around five minutes, during which it must be processed and fixed. The coated glass plate was then rushed back into the Lumen Museum, placed in the camera and the lens cap was removed, allowing the nine second exposure. The plate was then rushed back into the mobile darkroom and processed, with the fixing stage being done outside the van, to the delight of the gathered crowd.

Photographer Kurt Moser finishes processing the ambrotype portrait of television presenter Max Moor, in a tray of fixer, outside his mobile darkroom. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Photographer Kurt Moser finishes processing the ambrotype portrait of television presenter Max Moor, in a tray of fixer, outside his mobile darkroom. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Once you’ve explored the museum, I can’t recommend highly enough popping into the “AlpiNN” restaurant, which combines culinary delights with the most stunning view. Even the mountain water is a sensory delight.

Refelctions on the windows of the AlpiNN Food Space & Restaurant, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The summer season will continue to 13 October, open Monday to Sunday (including public holidays), between 10:00 to 16:00. Do keep in mind that the last cable car down is at 17:00! Find out more at https://www.lumenmuseum.it

Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Hikers exploring a trail on Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A Portrait Of Britain-Finalist

A bittersweet email from the British Journal of Photography and 1854 Media Awards let me know that “…your entry made it to the second & final round of judging, we regret to tell you that your image has not been shortlisted on this occasion”.

Still, nice to make it that far! Rather than the work remain unseen, thought I would share my Portrait Of Britain here and show the ten images I entered for the awards.

Many thanks to the judges and many congratulations to those shortlisted.

Camera and lens details can be found in all the captions below. All raw files were edited and processed using Adobe Lightroom Classic and finished off in either Alienskin Exposure X4 or Nik Collection Silver Efex Pro.

Alford Gardner, one of the few surviving Windrush passengers, from the 1948 SS Empire Windrush, which left Jamaica bound for Britain. Portrait photographed by the River Thames, South Bank, London, UK. May 25, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 25mm f1.4 lens.
Mezzo-soprano Angela Simkin, Opera Singer. The University Women’s Club 2 Audley Square, London, United Kingdom. July 17, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 42.5mm f1.2 lens.
Put It To The People March. Official figures put the numbers at the anti Brexit march at over one million. The demonstration, marched in central London calling for another EU referendum. The demo ends in Parliament Square. London, UK. March 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix S1R and Lumix S 24-105mm f4.0 lens.
It’s Their Future. Put It To The People March. Official figures put the numbers at the anti Brexit march at over one million. The demonstration, marched in central London calling for another EU referendum. The demo ends in Parliament Square. London, UK. March 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix S1R and Lumix S 24-105mm f4.0 lens.
The UK faces a homeless epidemic, with statistics showing that a homeless person dies every two weeks in London, one of the world’s wealthiest cities. Spiralling property prices are being cited as a huge factor, alongside access to mental health services becoming harder over the last several years. A homeless man lays on the street, apparently passed out from drinking the wine tied to the top of his belongings on his trolley. His guitar, probably used to busk with to pay for the wine, still strapped to his back. Another homeless man, wrapped in a sleeping bag, walks by. Tesco superstore, Pentonville Road, London, UK. March 21, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Sony RX1R M2.
Kel, a homeless man has decorated his corner of the subway for Christmas. He helps bewildered tourists with directions to Harrods and Winter Wonderland (funfair). He’s been homeless for four months following the breakup of his relationship, when he caught his brother and partner together. Hyde Park Corner subway, London, UK. December 16, 2017. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Sony RX1R M2.
London’s Metropolitan police statistics for 2018, show that knife crime has surged by 16 per cent in the capital, as Britain’s crime epidemic continues. John Costi, a reformed armed robber who was jailed for raids on London bookmakers, went on to graduate from the prestigious Central Saint Martin’s where he was awarded a first class honours degree in fine art. After a spiritual awakening during a 6-year prison sentence Costi sought to make sense of the world around him through art. Costi has used his own experiences to create a relationship with young people that allows him to offer guidance to help them to avoid becoming involved in violent crime, alongside also being involved with initiatives like “Art Against Knives”. Capital House, Weston Street, London. Knife Crime Violence In London, UK. May 05, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 12-60mm f2.8-4.0 lens.
Friends gather and perform parkour jumping tricks on the beach of the River Thames, during a heat wave bank holiday. Bankside, London, UK. May 06, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 12-60mm f2.8-4.0 lens.
A child runs around whilst bathed in rays of sunlight in the turbine hall. Tate Modern, during a heat wave bank holiday. Bankside, London, UK. May 06, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 50-200mm f2.8-4.0 lens.
Portrait of violinist Asia Jiménez Antón de Vez. London, UK. January 18, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Image shot on a Panasonic Lumix S1 and Lumix S 24-105mm f4.0 lens.