Tag Archives: press

Sarah Lee: Photographs

Guardian Photographer Sarah Lee’s Exhibition

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A visitor at the photography exhibition by Sarah Lee of The Guardian. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I attended the opening of Sarah Lee‘s wonderful photography exhibition last night at The Guardian. It’s a wonderful collection of some of the very best in newspaper portraiture and feature photography and I highly recommend a visit.

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A portrait of Sarah Lee of The Guardian at her exhibition’s private view. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Sarah adds, “I have Fiona Shields and Luke Dodd to thank for getting the idea off the ground, and David McCoy has printed it beautifully. They’ve done such a good job it would be lovely if you happen to be free and felt like popping along.”

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L-R The Guardian’s picture editor Fiona Shields and photographer Sarah Lee. Photography exhibition by Sarah Lee of The Guardian. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The exhibition is on at The Guardian‘s entrance, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1. It’s open during office hours and on until the first week of September, so hurry to catch it!

BBC Interview On Iconic Photography

Live Interview On BBC World News

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Thrilled to have permission from the BBC to share this clip of myself and journalism student Wilton Jackson from the University of Baton Rouge being interviewed on a segment about iconic photography.

The segment was based around the superb photograph from the Baton Rouge protest (July 10th, 2016) by Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman.

This clip is being used with full permission of the BBC (Global Planning Editor, BBC News, London). This was a live broadcast on July 21st, 2016.

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World Press Photo of the Year 2016

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An image by Australian photographer Warren Richardson is the World Press Photo of the Year

© Warren Richardson - Hope for a New Life

Hope for a New Life. A man passes a baby through the fence at the Serbia/Hungary border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015. Photo: ©Warren Richardson

When I logged on to the World Press Photo website and saw the the winning image, I found myself uncontrollably saying “wow” out loud. It’s an amazingly powerful image, highlighting an extremely important issue, photographed with such skill and empathy. Many congratulations to Warren Richardson for his stunning image and for the judges in choosing it out of the submitted 82,951 photographs.

Richardson is a freelance photographer, currently based in Budapest, Hungary. He explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone”.

View the entire collection of winning images from the 59th World Press Photo Contest. They were selected from 82,951 photos made by 5,775 photographers from 128 different countries.

For any photographers wondering about the technical aspects of the winning image; the shot was made on a Canon 5D MkII using a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens at 6400ISO, f1.4 with a shutter speed of 1/5 of a second.

Here are a selection of my favourite images from the contest

(in no particular order):

All photographs are copyright. Used with the permission of World Press Photo.

The Power Of Photography

The Napalm Girl By Nick Ut

In my opinion, AP photographer Nick Ut‘s Pulitzer Prize winning photograph from the Vietnam War, commonly known as the “Napalm Girl” is the most iconic and most powerful photograph ever taken.

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim's cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim’s cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

Here’s a superb ABC7 Special about the image, the stories and people involved. It’s well worth watching. Powerful, moving, interesting.


Fascinatingly, this TV documentary also clearly shows the power of photography compared to TV footage. Nick Ut’s photograph has such power and depth, compared to the TV footage which whilst strong, has no where near the strength of the still image. Anyone who doesn’t understand the power of a photograph needs to be shown this documentary.

Fleet Street Photo Exhibition

50 Press Photographs at “The Fleet Street Press” Coffee and Tea House

Authentic Fleets Street Photograph

Fleet Street is synonymous with British Newspapers – the “press”. Even though the last newspaper left the street over 20 years ago, the industry is still referred to as “Fleet Street” and as such, the street has a special symbolism for press photographers and journalists alike.

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at "The Fleet Street Press" Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at “The Fleet Street Press” Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

The exhibition is a collection of work from press photographers working for the national papers, international wire agencies and local papers around the country. It’s an insight into the world of press photography, covering wars, politics, features, portraits, disasters, press conferences and sports.

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at "The Fleet Street Press" Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at “The Fleet Street Press” Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

Images that are hard hitting, thought provoking or quirky; you’ll find the full gamut. We are not the paparazzi and as such, you won’t find any of that genre of image here. We are where the news is; we find the truth, we witness history and we are the eyes of the British public who rely on us to bring the news.

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at "The Fleet Street Press" Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

Setting up the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition at “The Fleet Street Press” Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. April 21, 2013. Photo: ©Jonathan Buckmaster

On a personal level, it’s with great pleasure that I share the news that two of my images have been selected to be exhibited in the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition:

Poo And The Band. Winnie The Poo lines up with the band in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace for the children's party. June 25, 2006. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Poo And The Band. Winnie The Poo lines up with the band in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace for the children’s party. June 25, 2006. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Love Your Job. A heavy downpour of rain soaks pedestrians and a businessman, as they pass an illuminated advertising sign saying "Love Your Job". Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Love Your Job. A heavy downpour of rain soaks pedestrians and a businessman, as they pass an illuminated advertising sign saying “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The exhibition will be open to the public from Monday, April 22nd, 2013 and is going to be a long term, evolving exhibition of work by press photographers. The images on display will be for sale. Each of the 50 photos is 40cmx30cm (A3’ish, including border) and printed on fibre based Baryta paper. Each sale will be printed to order and posted to the buyer within 7-10 working days. Each image is £150 and will be embossed with the Fleet Street Photograph logo. It’s a great opportunity to buy some great images at a great price.

Venue Details

“The Fleet Street Press” Coffee and Tea House, 3 Fleet Street, EC4Y 1AU, London. Opening times are 6.30am to 6.30pm, Monday to Friday. 10am to 5pm on Saturdays and 10am to 4pm on Sundays. You can follow The Fleet Street Press on Twitter and on their FaceBook page.

A Day Without News?

Raising Awareness To The Growing Number Of Journalists Killed & Injured In Armed Conflict Zones

Imagine a day without news; imagine not knowing what’s happening around the world. Conflicts taking place uncovered; perpetrators’ acts of violence going unchecked or the civilian casualties not given a voice.

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Journalists, be they writers or photographers, have always put their lives at risk by going to cover wars; to tell the stories and share the pictures. Over recent years, journalists have become legitimate targets in the minds of combatants and in some cases are actively targeted.

Recent years have seen the deaths of far too many amazing people; dedicated to the truth and upholding humanity by covering acts of inhumanity. 2012 was the deadliest year for journalism with a 33% increase in deaths, resulting in 90 colleagues losing their life.

On April 20, 2011, photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed whilst working in Misrata, Libya, covering the events of the bloody conflict. British photojournalist and filmmaker Tim Hetherington photographed on the last day of 'Operation Rock Avalanche' on October 25, 2007 at the Korengal Valley, East Afghanistan. Photo: Balazs Gardi

On April 20, 2011, photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed whilst working in Misrata, Libya, covering the events of the bloody conflict. British photojournalist and filmmaker Tim Hetherington photographed on the last day of ‘Operation Rock Avalanche’ on October 25, 2007 at the Korengal Valley, East Afghanistan. Photo: Balazs Gardi

On April 20, 2011, photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed whilst working in Misrata, Libya, covering the events of the bloody conflict.

On April 20, 2011, photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed whilst working in Misrata, Libya, covering the events of the bloody conflict.

February 22, 2012, legendary correspondent Marie Colvin was killed in Homs, Syria. Evidence from eye witnesses, including London Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy who was working with Marie, said that they had been deliberately targeted.

February 22, 2012, legendary correspondent Marie Colvin was killed in Homs, Syria. Evidence from eye witnesses, including London Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy who was working with Marie, said that they had been deliberately targeted.

February 22, 2012, photojournalist Remi Ochlik was killed in Homs, Syria. Evidence from eye witnesses, including London Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy who was working with Marie, said that they had been deliberately targeted.

February 22, 2012, photojournalist Remi Ochlik was killed in Homs, Syria. Evidence from eye witnesses, including London Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy who was working with Marie, said that they had been deliberately targeted.

Support

I’m supporting the work of colleagues in spreading the word and campaigning world leaders to bring attention to these injustices and develop laws to try and safeguard journalism; visit the website, A DAY WITHOUT NEWS and do the same. Lastly, please spread the word using your social media.

The Yasmin Parsons Print Auction

Print Auction In Aid Of Great Ormond Street Hospital

Edmond Terakopian, Richard Chambury and Kelvin Bruce during Yasmin’s Print Auction, Thursday October 11, 2012 Photo by Andrew Parsons / i-Images

On the 11th of October a group of press photographers got together to help out their friends and colleagues when it was found their two year old daughter Yasmin had been diagnosed with Leukaemia.

Karen and Andrew Parsons have set up a blog, Our Life With Leukaemia, sharing the pain of finding out their daughter is ill and charting the voyage the family has been put on. They also started a Just Giving page to raise funds for Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) where little Yasmin is being treated.

Kelvin Bruce and Richard Chambury show a set of images by Brian Rasic. Yasmin’s Print Auction, Thursday October 11, 2012 Photo by Andrew Parsons / i-Images

Photographers Eddie Mulholland and Kelvin Bruce had the idea of organising a print auction to help raise funds for GOSH. Photographers donated prints and images to be auctioned, the majority being printed by Alex McNaughton on Epson equipment.

Eddie Mulholland works the room during Yasmin’s Print Auction, Thursday October 11, 2012 Photo by Andrew Parsons / i-Images

There were many notable images donated for this auction, with the highlight being a signed and stamped print of a dust storm in Lesotho by Ian Berry from Magnum Photos.

A raffle was also organised and huge thanks go to all who generously donated prizes for this. Cameras were donated by Fuji, Leica, Nikon and Olympus and Calumet donated accessories and sensor clean prizes. The raffle alone raised £1350.00 for GOSH.

An A1 Giclee print of an image, Love Your Job by Edmond Terakopian is shown around the room by Kelvin Bruce. Yasmin’s Print Auction, Thursday October 11, 2012 Photo by Andrew Parsons / i-Images

I’m very proud to say that the grand total, including the raffle, raised on the night for GOSH by press photographers bidding on each others work came to £10,785.00.

We all wish you well Yasmin 🙂

Photographers view the prints on auction. Yasmin’s Print Auction, Thursday October 11, 2012 Photo by Andrew Parsons / i-Images