Tag Archives: press

25 Years of News Photography

Observer picture editor Greg Whitmore, who is leaving the newspaper, looks back at the photos that made the news during his quarter century at the helm of the picture desk.

Absolutely honoured to have my work featured in this gallery of images, spanning 25 years of our modern history. The honour is even more amplified when I look at the phenomenally powerful work from talented and devoted colleagues with whom I’m sharing the page, but also by the fact that the gallery was curated by such an extremely well respected and talented picture editor with true Fleet Street heritage.

You can see the gallery here and also read about the legendary Greg Whitmore’s experiences at The Observer here, covering his near 30 years at the paper.

Former firefighter Paul Dadge helps injured tube passenger Davinia Turrell away from Edgware Road underground station, following a terror attack during London’s rush hour. Four suicide bombers with rucksacks full of explosives killed 52 people and injured hundreds more in what was the worst single terrorist atrocity on British soil.
Photograph: ©Edmond Terakopian

You can read more about London’s darkest hour in recent history and my experiences on that day, here. The same photograph from this awful day was called one of the world’s most iconic photographs by the Daily Mirror.

NOIR Winning Image

The Club of Black and White Photography and NOIR the best of The Club of Black and White Photography curators have very kindly bestowed an award for best image of the month of August to one of my images.

The international group is comprised of 68,977 photographer members, so it’s nice to have an image chosen from such a talented and large group of people.

The image was shot as part of my reportage on the COVID 19 lockdown. It was made on my Panasonic Lumix G9 and an Olympus M.Zuiko 75mm f1.8 lens.

Lockdown Alfresco Coolness. A gentleman enjoys an outdoor drink in Soho, alfresco style, to keep within social distancing guidelines, during the relaxation of the COVID 19 lockdown. London, UK. August 09, 2020. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Sarah Lee: Photographs

Guardian Photographer Sarah Lee’s Exhibition

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A visitor at the photography exhibition by Sarah Lee of The Guardian. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I attended the opening of Sarah Lee‘s wonderful photography exhibition last night at The Guardian. It’s a wonderful collection of some of the very best in newspaper portraiture and feature photography and I highly recommend a visit.

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A portrait of Sarah Lee of The Guardian at her exhibition’s private view. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Sarah adds, “I have Fiona Shields and Luke Dodd to thank for getting the idea off the ground, and David McCoy has printed it beautifully. They’ve done such a good job it would be lovely if you happen to be free and felt like popping along.”

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L-R The Guardian’s picture editor Fiona Shields and photographer Sarah Lee. Photography exhibition by Sarah Lee of The Guardian. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1. August 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The exhibition is on at The Guardian‘s entrance, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1. It’s open during office hours and on until the first week of September, so hurry to catch it!

BBC Interview On Iconic Photography

Live Interview On BBC World News

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Thrilled to have permission from the BBC to share this clip of myself and journalism student Wilton Jackson from the University of Baton Rouge being interviewed on a segment about iconic photography.

The segment was based around the superb photograph from the Baton Rouge protest (July 10th, 2016) by Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman.

This clip is being used with full permission of the BBC (Global Planning Editor, BBC News, London). This was a live broadcast on July 21st, 2016.

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World Press Photo of the Year 2016

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An image by Australian photographer Warren Richardson is the World Press Photo of the Year

© Warren Richardson - Hope for a New Life

Hope for a New Life. A man passes a baby through the fence at the Serbia/Hungary border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015. Photo: ©Warren Richardson

When I logged on to the World Press Photo website and saw the the winning image, I found myself uncontrollably saying “wow” out loud. It’s an amazingly powerful image, highlighting an extremely important issue, photographed with such skill and empathy. Many congratulations to Warren Richardson for his stunning image and for the judges in choosing it out of the submitted 82,951 photographs.

Richardson is a freelance photographer, currently based in Budapest, Hungary. He explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone”.

View the entire collection of winning images from the 59th World Press Photo Contest. They were selected from 82,951 photos made by 5,775 photographers from 128 different countries.

For any photographers wondering about the technical aspects of the winning image; the shot was made on a Canon 5D MkII using a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens at 6400ISO, f1.4 with a shutter speed of 1/5 of a second.

Here are a selection of my favourite images from the contest

(in no particular order):

All photographs are copyright. Used with the permission of World Press Photo.

The Power Of Photography

The Napalm Girl By Nick Ut

In my opinion, AP photographer Nick Ut‘s Pulitzer Prize winning photograph from the Vietnam War, commonly known as the “Napalm Girl” is the most iconic and most powerful photograph ever taken.

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim's cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim’s cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

Here’s a superb ABC7 Special about the image, the stories and people involved. It’s well worth watching. Powerful, moving, interesting.


Fascinatingly, this TV documentary also clearly shows the power of photography compared to TV footage. Nick Ut’s photograph has such power and depth, compared to the TV footage which whilst strong, has no where near the strength of the still image. Anyone who doesn’t understand the power of a photograph needs to be shown this documentary.