Tag Archives: exhibition

Don McCullin in conversation with Fergal Keane

Probably the most moving, revealing, honest, soul shaking and tear jerking talk I have ever been to, was last night’s event at Kings Place. Photojournalist Don McCullin opened his heart and shared his soul in a way I’ve only ever known from the very closest of friends. To say it captivated every ounce of my being would be putting it mildly.

Photojournalist Don McCullin in conversation with foreign correspondent Fergal Keane. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, UK. 24 April 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Photojournalist Don McCullin shares a story from the Vietnam War, during his conversation with foreign correspondent Fergal Keane. Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, UK. 24 April 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Without doubt, Don McCullin is one of the very greatest photographers of our time. He was in conversation with foreign correspondent Fergal Keane OBE, as they discussed McCullin’s 60 year career, covering his extensive work in war zones across the world, his documenting of poverty throughout Britain, as well as his more recent, therapeutic landscape photography.

The evening though was made unforgettable by hearing, nay, feeling, the inner most thoughts and emotions of a journalist who has dedicated his life to showing the injustices suffered by many.

The Preoccupation With Gear

As the talk came to an end and I collected my emotions, it came as the biggest shock to hear the first question:

“What’s your favourite film stock?”…

Astonishing that the whole emotional and intellectually challenging rollercoaster ride of pure, uncensored heart felt emotions, dotted with the very best of the “stiff upper lip” humour as a temporary escape, a member of the audience’s only question was about the type of film used.

To think that the power of McCullin’s images have anything to do with the brand of film used was as astonishing as it was infuriating. McCullin of course answered patiently that it was Tri-X, but followed with his own question of “Let me ask you something; why did you come here tonight? What were you expecting?”. There was no cruelty in the question, just a genuine wonderment of why after his outpouring of emotion about the human condition, that the only thing thought worthwhile asking was about film. Of course there was no answer from the chap and the questions continued, thankfully about the actual work, not film, aperture, shutter speed or cameras.

Don McCullin’s words, on the wall in his retrospective at the Tate Britain.

Don McCullin’s words, on the wall in his retrospective at the Tate Britain.

During the talk, McCullin did share that sadly he felt that none of his pictures made a difference. Decades of wars continued, captured by his mastery of seeing and he moved onto wars which he didn’t cover. The futility in his voice was exceptionally moving. Thankfully, the final question of the night was as wonderful as it was powerful. A lady thanked him for his dedication and work. Saying that whilst when he was at school studying history, he didn’t have the advantage of seeing pictures by Don McCullin, she had the tremendous advantage of studying history and seeing the photographs by Don McCullin.

Some Thoughts

Anyone who knows me, knows that I take a huge interest in the equipment I use for my work, be that professional assignments and commissions, or personal work. However, this equipment is the tool which helps me create. Its part of the beginning process and not the be all and end all in my photography.

Photography has, what I think is a unique peculiarity about it. When some people look at an amazing photograph, they immediately jump to asking what camera and lens is used, or in the case of this chap from last night, what film was used. However, if the same person has a great meal in a restaurant, they would never ask the chef about the make of pans used, and the model number of the cooker used. When has anyone asked a great author about which pen, typewriter or word processor they used?

Its great to have nice gear. For me, when I started out as a photographer, I had an aperture priority only camera called the Nikon EM. It was great and I loved it. However, I outgrew it relatively quickly and I would miss photographs or not be able to craft them the way I had envisaged, because of it’s inadequacies. My second camera, a second hand, original Canon F1, had a terrible focusing screen and a stiff lens, which meant focusing became an issue when speed was of the essence. At that stage, as I began my career on my first local paper, the Ealing Gazette, I vowed that I would as much as possible, buy the best equipment I could, as I never wanted to miss a picture because my equipment wasn’t capable enough. I never wanted to blame my tools. I should take the blame, learn what I did wrong and improve.

Looking at photography, especially for those who enjoy this as the most wonderful hobby, or even those about to take the road to becoming a professional, I have one piece of advise; recognise the camera as a tool, for making wonderful imagery. Invest your money after having bought a decent camera and lens, at the beginning stages, into learning about photography. Books, exhibitions and articles written in proper, established photography magazines as well as magazines and newspapers which use great photography. Blogs and YouTube videos by self appointed gurus and influencers will do nothing for improving your photography. Search out workshops by real, proven photographers with real track records, not fake robot followed Instagram accounts by self appointed ambassadors. Photography becomes so much more joyous and interesting when one starts to invest time and money into the craft, rather than just the gear. The gear will always be there and once you know how to craft an image, then getting better gear and more lenses will elevate and not hinder your photography.

Mindfulness, intelligence and emotion, mixed with an aesthetic, a sense of timing and an understanding of the situation, makes the photograph. I’ve found that when a photographer genuinely starts to understand photography, then they truly appreciate the ability of their tools and this then elevate’s their imagery. It’s a long term thing and results in a life long love of photography. Those who just see the gear as being the important thing, will get lots of kit, get disillusioned quickly and leave photography. Play the long game is my advice.

Incidentally, if you haven’t yet seen his retrospective at Tate Britain, I can’t urge you strongly enough to catch it before it closes on the 6th of May 2019.

Travel Photographer Of The Year Exhibition

TPOTY 2019 At London Bridge City

Travel Photographer of the Year Exhibition, London Bridge City (by City Hall and Tower Bridge). London, UK. March 28, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Absolutely thrilled to see the fabulous Travel Photographer Of The Year exhibition. So many stunning photographs in such a wonderful setting, just by the River Thames and City Hall, with a backdrop of Tower Bridge in London, UK. The free, open air exhibition is on until April 30th this year.

Best Single Image In A Portfolio; Special Mention. I shot the image in the Tate Modern, using my Lumix G9 with the Leica DG 50-200mm (giving a reach of 400mm). Travel Photographer of the Year Exhibition, London Bridge City (by City Hall and Tower Bridge). London, UK. March 28, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Travel Photographer of the Year Exhibition, London Bridge City (by City Hall and Tower Bridge). London, UK. March 28, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

It’s great to have one of my images in the show. Shot on my Panasonic Lumix G9 with the wonderful Leica DG 50-200mm. If you like the image, I would appreciate if you could vote for it please 🙂 To vote, please use this link and choose image number 53. Thank you 🙂

Travel Photographer of the Year Exhibition, London Bridge City (by City Hall and Tower Bridge). London, UK. March 28, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Oblique Strategies Photographic Exhibition

London Independent Photography; Ealing Satellite Group Exhibition

Opens On September 7th, 2018.

19 photographers from Ealing London Independent Photography, have created a collection of work in response to a set of Oblique Strategies originally written by Brian Eno. The images address the challenges of creativity and how they can be overcome by ingenuity and lateral thinking.

Exhibition: 7th – 15th September 2018
Open weekdays 12pm – 7pm (Fridays until 8pm), weekends 11am – 6pm

St Mary’s Church, St Mary’s Road, Ealing W5 5RH.

Huge thanks to the support of Panasonic Lumix and Pixelrights for sponsoring this project.

The project can be seen on our Pixelrights gallery website, Ealing Photo Gallery, where there is an opportunity to also purchase prints.

Also, massive thanks to Hauke from Fire & Flame for all the fabulous design work, not only creating all the fantastic leaflets, invitations and so on, but for also creating the elegant layouts and typography for the actual exhibition pieces.

The exhibition is part of Ealing BEAT (art trail).

FF0145_LIP_BEAT_Social_2000x2000px_2018_v1

 

RITES OF PASSAGE: BETWEEN LIGHT AND SHADOW

An exhibition featuring the work of Othello De’Souza-Hartley

Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow

Othello De’souza-Hartley by his photographs from the Masculinity Project. Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow group exhibition. Sulger-Buel Lovell gallery, Unit 2 La Gare, 51 Surrey Row, London. June 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A very interesting group exhibition at the Sulger-Buel Lovell gallery, Unit 2 La Gare, 51 Surrey Row, London SE1 0BZ. It’s best to ring 0203 268 2101 before you go as the gallery is generally open in the afternoons, but can be visited anytime by appointment. The exhibition is on until August 7th, 2016.

There’s a powerful set of images from visual artist Othello De’Souza-Hartley from his Masculinity project.

Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow

Othello De’souza-Hartley by his photographs from the Masculinity Project. Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow group exhibition. Sulger-Buel Lovell gallery, Unit 2 La Gare, 51 Surrey Row, London. June 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I also really liked this sculpture by Neill Wright.

Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow

Hobby Horse by Neill Wright. Rites Of Passage; Between Light and Shadow group exhibition. Sulger-Buel Lovell gallery, Unit 2 La Gare, 51 Surrey Row, London. June 17, 2016. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Portrait Salon 2015

A Portrait Of Jordan

Happy to share that my portrait of Jordan Ebbitt has been selected for Portrait Salon 2015. It’s to be published in the book and will be exhibited at The Embassy Tea Gallery, Union Street, Bankside SE1, from the 19th of November 2015.

A portrait of Jordan Ebbitt. London. April 10, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A portrait of Jordan Ebbitt. London. April 10, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The portrait was shot using an Olympus OM-D E-M1 and Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm f1.8 lens during one of my bespoke one on one photography workshops. The lighting was from two Quantum Q-Flashes with soft boxes. Processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom and finished using Alienskin’s Exposure 7 plugin.

Opening Night Of Opera By The River Exhibition

Private View & Launch Party

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London Photo: Nigel Howard / www.nigelhowardmedia.com

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London
Photo: Nigel Howard / http://www.nigelhowardmedia.com

September 30th saw the opening and private view of my solo exhibition, Opera By The River. Thrilled that so many friends and colleagues could join, some making considerable journeys to get there. An equally great joy was to be reunited again with the amazingly talented musicians from the Royal College of Music. A true delight to meet up with the amazing singers and instrumentalists who were part of Albert Herring, the opera.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The exhibition, kindly supported by Olympus, will continue until October the 11th on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Christopher Middleton

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London Photo: Nigel Howard / www.nigelhowardmedia.com

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London
Photo: Nigel Howard / http://www.nigelhowardmedia.com

The second part of the evening took place at the launch party (opening night only) at The Deck in the National Theatre.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. A poster shows the way for the evening’s party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Some more imagery was on display from the project. The opening and private view of

Some more imagery was on display from the project. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

As is customary on such occasions, I had a short speech to give and thought to share it here with a wider audience:

Speeches. The opening and private view of

Speeches. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Speeches. The opening and private view of

Speeches. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

There are some people in this room who I have known for over 25 years and some in this room who I have known for nine months (no, I’m not pregnant, this is all me!). Regardless, you’ve all been part of my life in photography and it’s such a joy to share this reportage with you. As Albert Herring went on his journey in the opera, I too had the pleasure of going on a journey with this most amazing group of supremely talented singers and instrumentalists from the Royal College of Music. 31,794 pictures shot over seven months meant I could really share with the wider world the passion and hard work that goes into putting on such a wonderful opera and I thank every single person involved for letting me delve so deeply with my cameras.

This reportage was a personal project. It came from the wish of wanting to shoot a photo essay and as luck would have it, I met Christopher Middleton on one of my workshops. When I found out he was Assistant Head of Opera at the Royal College of Music, this got me thinking. Speaking over several months when I found out about Benjamin Britten’s Albert Herring being the next production, with Britten having been a former pupil and the college’s theater being called the Britten Theatre, everything just seemed to come together.

I must say thanks to Michael Rosewell and Nick Sears from the Opera School who along with Christopher saw my vision for this project and welcomed me in with open arms. My thanks naturally extend to the Directorate for letting me have the access I needed to shoot such an intimate and in depth essay.

My thanks to the wonderful string quartet from the Royal College of Music for their beautiful music; you’ve made my heart sing.

My gratitude also goes to the super talented Stuart Smith for designing such a wonderful exhibition. It’s such a joy to work with someone not only so pleasant, but also with so much passion and understanding of photography. Stuart also kindly designed an exhibition book to go along with this project. Please make sure you pick up one of the free book leaflets and write in for your copy. It really looks amazing and I must admit to being teary eyed when I first saw the final design.

I’d also like to congratulate the wonderful team at Standard8 led by Tom Snell for their beautiful printing and exhibition construction. Over 350,000 people will see this exhibition and I’m proud for my images to be displayed in such a wonderful installation.

It’s one thing to have an idea and another thing to shoot it. Making it available for all to see is the next big hurdle. After all, pictures that remain in boxes or tucked away in virtual folders on hard drives don’t ever live up to their potential to move people. My immense gratitude goes to Olympus, not only for making the wonderful cameras I used to shoot Opera By The River, but for seeing and believing in my idea. I have to single out Mark Thackara from Olympus for his support. If it wasn’t for Olympus and the countless people there who have made this exhibition and book a reality, we wouldn’t all be together now. Thank you all so much.

Finally, thank you all; friends, colleagues and guests for coming this evening. Hope you’ve enjoyed the show and will help spread the word so others will get a chance to see the exhibition before it closes on October the 11th.

You’ve seen what they look like but the real treat to hear what they sound like. I’m thrilled to say that we are all about to be treated to a little bit of Britten’s Albert Herring by the wonderful people at the Royal College of Music.

A string quartet from the Royal College of Music performs at the opening and private view of

A string quartet from the Royal College of Music performs at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Christopher Middleton

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank and opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank and opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Edmond Terakopian's solo exhibition, Opera By The River on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 29, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Edmond Terakopian’s solo exhibition, Opera By The River on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 29, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Further reading on Opera By The River:

BBC – Behind the scenes at the Royal College of Music

AP Magazine – Opera by the River photo exhibition

I hope that you can pop by and enjoy the exhibition before it finishes and also share this post widely so more will get a chance to visit the installation.

Olympus_Opera-River_Poster-FLAT

Opera By The River

A photo reportage on Benjamin Britten’s Albert Herring At the Royal College of Music

Thrilled to announce my forthcoming solo exhibition which will be on from September 30th to October 11th, 2015. It’s an outdoor exhibition on London’s South Bank, very close to the National Theatre (it’s actually just behind the IBM building) on the Riverside Walkway. There’s no entrance fee and is free for all. Do kindly spread the word!

Olympus_Opera-River_Poster-FLAT

This personal project is the culmination of seven months of photography with the Opera School at the Royal College of Music in London. With the kind support of Olympus I’m overjoyed to be able to share this work with you as an exhibition.

The exhibition itself is designed by the fabulous Stuart Smith.

It’s been a try joy to spend this time with the amazingly talented students at the RCM and the superb staff who have been more than helpful in making the reportage a reality.

You can follow more on the project on my Twitter and Instagram (@terakopian); just look for #operabytheriver

Further Reading:

Opening Night & Private View

BBC coverage of Opera By The River

Opening Night

Press Release

Embargo: For immediate release
Photo reportage by Edmond Terakopian:
The Royal College of Music photo essay project, supported by Olympus.

Opera by the River is an outdoor photographic installation, exhibiting the work of Edmond Terakopian. Terakopian spent over 7 months working with and photographing the Royal College of Music (RCM), documenting the entire process of staging an opera from the initial auditions through to the final stage take down.

From January 2015 Terakopian worked closely with the RCM and they gave him unique access to their preparations for the production of the opera ‘Albert Herring’. The photo essay captured intimate and revealing images of the opera singers, members of the orchestra and production team as they developed and finally staged the historic opera by Benjamin Britten, a former pupil of the RCM himself.

The photo essay has been edited to 62 images, giving a glimpse into the one of the world’s great conservatoires, The Royal College of Music. The photographs will be displayed at an outdoor exhibition entitled ‘Opera by the River’, on the SouthBank London.

The exhibition is free for the public to view, 24 hours a day.

The exhibition is being staged at RiverSide West on the SouthBank. Overlooking the River Thames it is a 4 minute stroll from the National Theatre and is situated behind the IBM building. It will open from Wednesday 30th September to Sunday 11th October.

The Terakopian Royal College of Music photo essay project was supported by Olympus, and shot primarily on an OM-D E-M5 Mark ll, the remainder on an OM-D E-M1.