Tag Archives: collector

Love Your Job Print, Edition Of 25 Released

One of my favourite street photographs, is now available as an edition of 25. Even before publicising the edition, 3 prints have already been sold, so at the time of writing, there are 22 prints left. Perhaps the perfect Christmas treat or gift?

A heavy downpour of rain soaks a businessman, as he passes an illuminated advertising sign stating “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The edition is an archival Giclée, gallery quality print. The photograph is printed on A3 (approx 11-3/4” x 16-1/2” or 297mm x 420mm) with a white border, on Hahnemüehle Photo Rag Bright White. 310 gsm on 100% cotton art paper. Signed on the back, name on the front left, edition numbered on the front, along with my embossing on the right side. Each print will also come with a certificate of authenticity.

The price of each print is £400 (which includes VAT) plus shipping. Each print will be shipped in a sturdy tube. As the edition gets sold out, it’s customary for the price to rise near the end of the edition, so it’s wiser to invest earlier on. Please contact me via the Contact page to make arrangements.

For me, the image perfectly encapsulates modern life in the city. The duality of striving for happiness and survival, with far too many working in jobs they don’t love, to make ends meet. That constant struggle.

The image was made as I was running to the car park. As soon as I saw the light from the advertising hoarding, it made me stop. The way it was lighting the rain and the wet pavement caught my eye. It was only a moment later that I read the message. The problem though, was that the digital advertising was a constant slideshow. None of the other adverts were as bright or simple; they were in fact colourful and messy, and as a light source didn’t work as they were much dimmer.

I must have waited for around 20 minutes. Suddenly from the right hand side, a businessman in a raincoat, holding a briefcase, rushed past. It was so quick, I managed to shoot two frames on my Leica. As luck would have it, the timing of the businessman coincided with the “Love Your Job” slide showing on the advertising board.

I love my job 😉

The photograph has been recognised by various awards and curators over the years, including being a runner-up in the Driven Creativity shortlist and exhibited in London, Paris & Berlin. It was a finalist in Travel Photographer Of The Year too. It was exhibited in The Press Photographers’ Year in the National Theatre, as well as the Fleet Street Photo Exhibition in London. It was commended by the judges of the Fotoura International Street Photography Awards as well as used as a double page spread in AP Magazine’s ‘Tribute To Leica’ issue. It also won the Life At Work category of the British Life Photography Awards. It was judged as Professional Photographer of the Year’s winner in the Street Photography category. It also made The Huffington Post Pictures of the Year in 2011.

To purchase your print, please use the CONTACT page to get in touch.

Two Days To Go! MSF Fundraiser

Our fundraising print auction, almost eight months in the making, ends this Sunday, November 15th at 5pm. The auction is open now for bids, so please swing by, look at the amazing selection of prints, make an investment and literally, help to save lives.

What challenging times we’re living in. Most of the world is sadly gripped by a second wave of this awful pandemic. At least the environment is definitely benefitting from these lockdowns as we all become Zoom experts though.

Sadly the timing of our MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders) fundraising auction couldn’t be more appropriate. Every penny we raise will go directly to the organisation and help their stellar work across 70 countries, battling this pandemic.

From purely an investment point of view, not surprisingly, spending has been lower for so many people during the past nine months and I think that’s probably going to be reflected in the bidding in our auction, which could end with some bargains to be had. Of course every penny raised will still help MSF and benefit all those whose aid they come to.

Some thoughts and advice from TV auctioneer extraordinaire James Lewis on collecting photography.

James has kindly been a big supporter of this auction and donated his time. Bamford Auctions and The Saleroom have also waived their fees too, so all of this project is about MSF. So do swing by, have a look, collect some great photography and help make an immediate and crucial difference: https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/timed/bamfords/catalogue-id-bamfor10698

8 Day To Go! Help Us, Help MSF

Eyewitness MSF Fundraising Photographic Print Auction

We, at Eyewitness have organised a print auction of 66 prints by 42 photographers worldwide, to raise funds for Médecins Sans Frontières’s (MSF) coronavirus crisis appeal.

Eyewitness MSF Charity Photographic Print Auction Audio Slideshow from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

To see the catalogue of all the images, please visit Bamfords Auctions.

Photographers featured (in order) are: Shane Balkowitsch (USA), Fabrizia Costa (UK), Steven Neeson (UK), Paul Lowe (UK), Ian Berry (UK), Tom Stoddart (UK), John Downing (UK), Crispin Rodwell (Rep of Ireland), Tim Page (Australia), Yoshie Nishikawa (Italy/Japan), Mark Harrison (UK), Jason Bell (UK/USA), Clive Arrowsmith (UK), Rob Heyman (Australia), Edmond Terakopian (UK), Johnson Wee (Malaysia), Stuart Wood (UK), Ross Grieve (UK), Paul Sanders (UK) and Greg Finck (France). 

Eyewitness MSF Charity Photographic Print Auction

MSF’s Coronavirus Crisis Appeal

After seven months of work, I’m thrilled, excited, nervous and overjoyed to share a project that our team at Eyewitness have been working on.

It’s an online print auction with the wonderful folks at Bamfords and the amazing James Lewis, of 66 photographic prints by 42 photographers worldwide, to raise funds for Médecins Sans Frontières’s COVID 19 fund.

People out for a Sunday stroll sit and enjoy the view of the bay with its yachts and the town perched on the hillsides. Whitby, Yorkshire, UK. 1974. Photo: Ian Berry / Magnum Photos

The auction is on now and will be ending on Sunday 15th November 2020 at 05:00PM (GMT). You can see the auction lots here: https://www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk/sales/derby/c14nov20/

Whilst in the COVID 19 pandemic lockdown, a concerned group of 17 photographers, members of the Eyewitness Collective, dispersed across several continents, came up with an idea: to collect a series of prints by members and by selected invited photographers, in order to raise funds for the battle against this awful pandemic. We have been overjoyed by the feedback and thrilled that so many world-class photographers, true masters of their craft, have donated their beautiful prints. 

9th Division Trooper, ‘Y’ Bridge, Mini Tet, Saigon, Vietnam, 1968. Photo: Tim Page

As numbers of infections and deaths due to COVID 19 are sadly on the rise again and lockdowns are imminent, it’s very timely to make this project a reality, so we ask our friends and colleagues in the media to help this cause. 

As an international group, we couldn’t have chosen a more important, dynamic and crucial group of people as the teams at MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders). The organisation is working across the world, to counter COVID 19. With nearly 50 years of experience fighting epidemics, protecting the most vulnerable and saving countless lives, we are humbled to do our part in helping MSF.  We ask you to join us in turning our hopes into reality and make a difference in the lives of so many.

“MSF would like to say a huge thank you to the Eyewitness Collective for choosing to support our COVID-19 response. MSF is currently racing to respond to the pandemic in over 70 countries, and funds raised by the Eyewitness Collective will undoubtedly help us to achieve our vital priorities. These include supporting health systems and authorities, protecting vulnerable populations through vital medical services, improving infection prevention and control measures, and even opening new projects” – Meera Patel, Community and Corporate Giving Coordinator, MSF UK.

I’m humbled to have my two donated prints in the company of an image by Magnum Photos’ legendary photographer Ian Berry from his iconic series The English, an image by the renowned Vietnam War photographer Tim Page, an image by the celebrated photojournalist Tom Stoddart from The Sudan, the fall of the Berlin Wall by the prominent photojournalist Paul Lowe, timeless fine art prints by the creative Yoshie Nishikawa, as well as several celebrity portraits by the likes of Mark Harrison, Jason Bell, Nicky Johnston and Clive Arrowsmith, to name just a few. 

A rare moment of joy between siblings at Ajiep, in Bahr El Ghazal Province , south Sudan during the devastating famine of 1998. Photo: Tom Stoddart

The vast majority of the participating photographers are multi award-winning creatives, whose recognisable works grace the walls of galleries and private collections, the pages of magazines and books, the world over. The collection of prints cover fine art, photojournalism, music, street photography, portraiture, abstracts, landscape and daily life. We also have a couple of timely images made during this pandemic.

“The art of photography has been the choice for the wise investor for the past decade. It is a great honour to team up with some of the world’s greatest photographers to help the world face its biggest challenge in over a century” – James Lewis, CEO of Bamfords, is a regular face and voice on TV and radio.

Auctioneer James Lewis, CEO of Bamfords, is a regular face and voice on television and radio; he is without doubt one of the most recognised faces in the international antiques world. Photo: Stuart Wood

We’re thrilled to embark on this project and collaborate with the well-loved TV auctioneer extraordinaire, the wonderful James Lewis, who will be spearheading this online auction. He has generously donated his time and expertise, so that all of the money raised from this print auction can be donated to the MSF COVID 19 appeal, funding their emergency teams of experts as they help save lives. We’re most thankful that, as well as working tirelessly for many weeks preparing the sale, the wonderful team at the auction house Bamfords, have waived all auction fees, as have the kind folks at The Saleroom, which will provide the online platform for this auction, for free. This collaboration will ensure that the funds raised will go to MSF.

“GraphiStudio is thrilled to be doing its part in the photographic community and helping the Eyewitness Collective with their charity fundraising print auction to help raise funds for MSF’s COVID 19 fund” – Dario Righetto, GraphiStudio Global Marketing Director 

We’re also most thankful to our friends at the world renowned GraphiStudio who will be making several of the museum quality prints of these wonderful images and are supporting our initiative by waiving all of their fees too. 

A couple laugh together on the West side of the Berlin Wall as the first people began crossing into the other half of the city. Berlin, Germany. 1989. Photo: Paul Lowe

Full List of Photographers Who Have Donated Their Work

Amelia Troubridge (UK), Brian Harris (UK), Clive Arrowsmith (UK), Crispin Rodwell (Rep of Ireland), Dave Sinclair (UK), David A Williams (Canada), Edmond Terakopian (UK), Fabrizia Costa (UK), Giles Duley (UK), Greg Finck (France), Ian Berry (UK), Ian Gavan (UK), Jason Bell (UK), Jill Furmanovsky (UK), Johnson Wee (Malaysia), John Downing (UK), Marcus Bell (Australia), Mark Harrison (UK), Mark Waugh (UK), Markus Andersen (Australia), Michael Mac Sweeney (Rep of Ireland), Nick Turpin (UK), Nicky Johnston (UK), Nik Pekridis (Greece), Paul Lowe (UK), Paul Sanders (UK), Peter Adams (Australia), Peter Neill (UK), Richard Bradbury (UK), Rob Heyman (Australia), Rob Taggart (UK), Rocco Ancora (Australia), Ross Grieve (UK), Salvatore Dimino (Italy), Shane Balkowitsch (USA), Steve Scalone (Australia), Steven Neeson (UK), Stuart Wood (UK), Terry Harris (UK), Tim Page (Australia), Tom Stoddart (UK) and Yoshie Nishikawa (Italy).

My Metaphysical 3 I photographed these invisible feelings of mine. The melancholy of existence and the absence of time. Photo: Yoshie Nishikawa

As numbers of infections and deaths due to COVID 19 are sadly on the rise again and more lockdowns are imminent, it’s very timely to make this project a reality, so we ask our friends and colleagues and all lovers of photography to help us publicise this project far and wide. The more we raise, the more people will survive this horrid pandemic, which affects us all, regardless of geography. 

Deserted London town following the COVID 19 pandemic and the first month of the coronavirus lockdown. The deserted courtyard in the famous Covent Garden Apple Market. London, UK. April 23, 2020. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A heavy downpour of rain soaks pedestrians as they pass an illuminated advertising sign saying “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

So please visit the auction, register and place a bid or two on some wonderful photography: https://www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk/sales/derby/c14nov20/

A small selection of the 66 images can be viewed in the gallery below.

Absolute Craftsmanship; Sheer Beauty

Leica M9-P Edition Hermès

Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’. Photo: © Leica

For me cameras and lenses are tools which let me create pictures to convey stories. I decide to choose the best tools for my way of working, which is why for most of my career, I have chosen Leica. Every once in a while though, Leica produce cameras which are probably never going to be used as a tool, but become works of great craftsmanship; objects of absolute beauty; works of art. I must admit that every once in a while, I do look upon some of these creations with great admiration from an aesthetic point of view and from appreciation of great craftsmanship. Having looked at the M9-P Edition Hermes, I feel this admiration again.

To quote from the Leica press release:

“The Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ is offered in a choice of two different sets, containing either one or three lenses. Compared to the standard versions, the lenses included in the sets also reveal numerous differences in design, ensuring perfect harmonisation between the cameras, their lenses and accessories.

The first of the Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ sets will be available in May 2012, in a worldwide limited edition of 300. In addition to the camera, the set includes a silver-anodised Leica Summilux-M 50mm f/1.4 ASPH. lens.

This will be followed by a very special set, which will be available in June 2012. The Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ – Série Limitée Jean-Louis Dumas, in a strictly limited edition of only 100 sets, is a celebration of the friendship and collaboration between Jean-Louis Dumas, the former president of Hermès, who died in May 2010, and Leica Camera AG. The camera in this set is accompanied by three lenses: a Leica Summicron-M 28mm f/ 2 ASPH., a Leica Noctilux-M 50mm f/0.95 ASPH. and a Leica APO-Summicron-M 90mm f/2 ASPH., all featuring a stunning silver-anodised finish.

Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ – Série Limitée Jean-Louis Dumas. Photo: © Leica

This unique collection of photographic equipment finds a fitting home in a hand-finished Hermès camera bag that is available exclusively as a part of this second set. This is the first Leica camera bag ever to have been created by Hermès, a company world-famous for its manufacturing excellence. As homage to Jean- Louis Dumas, a Leica photographer, the second set also includes a book with a selection of his pictures. On 190 pages, this photographic work in two volumes shows an entertainingly diverse portfolio of 200 black-and-white images captured by Jean-Louis Dumas with his Leica M camera.

The Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ is scheduled to be available in the UK from May 2012, at a UK suggested retail price of £18,000 inc VAT. The Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ – Série Limitée Jean-Louis Dumas is scheduled to be available in the UK from June 2012, at a UK suggested retail price of £36,000 inc VAT. In the UK, both cameras will be available exclusively from the Leica Store Mayfair, 34 Bruton Place, London W1J 6NR. Tel: 020 7629 1351, www.leica-storemayfair.co.uk  ”

Although way outside of the league of most working photographers, it is a thing of beauty; the camera, the lenses, the gorgeous bag and even the box.

Leica M9 Titanium

My day with one of the most exclusive digital cameras ever made

World Exclusive

Photographer Edmond Terakopian tests the limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo By Brett

There were rumours abound before Photokina 2010 about Leica bringing out a new camera; talk of an M9.2, a different digital M and even a digital body that would take the Leica R lenses. Well, the different digital M turned out to be right, but who would have thought it would be anything like the Leica M9 Titanium, or Titan as it’s also called?

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium, complete with Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH in Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I must admit to not being a big fan of the limited editions that companies produce; I’m a photographer and want tools which are reliable and produce the utmost in imaging quality. I’ve often sighed to myself when I’ve seen limited editions of the M6 or M8. My thoughts at the time were always the wish that Leica would stop concentrating on these and put all their energy into making a ‘proper’ digital rangefinder. For me, the M8 and M8.2 just didn’t cut it. Well, the M9 certainly does cut it and ever since reviewing it for the BJP at launch, I’ve been saving for my own M9 which I recently bought. Leica has changed a lot in recent years; fresh thinking has brought amazing products like the S2 and some stunning M optics as well as the wonderful M9. So, considering the current lineup, I didn’t sigh when I first saw pictures from the launch, but was rather intrigued.

The M9 Titanium though is an absolute departure from putting exclusive leathers and other materials onto the normal camera’s outer casings. Although it has an M9 at it’s heart, it has a completely a new casing, even down to the base plate. There is also some new technology in the viewfinder, more of which later. As it’s name suggests, the material is Titanium; tough and light – pretty much ideal for a camera. Every piece of exterior metal is made from solid Titanium and the body is covered in beautiful high grade leather.

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium, complete with Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH in Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

So, what to do about designing the camera? Well, the answer surprisingly was to approach a car designer; to quote Leica:

“The exclusive special edition Leica M9 “Titanium” is the result of a collaboration with Walter de’Silva, the prominent automobile designer. Responsible for groundbreaking design concepts for the latest models from the Volkswagen Group, the chief designer and his Audi Design Team have re-interpreted the design of the LEICA M9 just as he envisaged it. The outcome is a unique camera with a new interpretation of the characteristic features of Leica rangefinder cameras, which lends precision engineering, unique style and solid titanium to extraordinary formal design.”

It may seem a strange thing to do as cars and cameras are so extremely different, but seeing the camera, I must say that the collaboration is an absolute success. In the pictures first released, the camera and lens looked good, but in real life, it looks and feels superb.

In the days of film, I used to have a Leica 35mm f1.4 Titanium lens – I must say I always loved the way it felt. Well, this camera takes that feeling and multiplies it many times over. I can’t think of anything that can make an M9 feel cheap, but the M9 Titanium does just that! As much as I admire the look and the feel of the camera, I also absolutely adore the lens. The ‘kit’ lens is Leica’s extraordinary Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH. This too is created using solid Titanium and also comes with a beautifully crafted Titanium lens hood, specifically made for the camera. Even the red Leica badge is custom made from resin and hand-engraved with enamel for the camera. There is also an interesting leather holster for the camera, which again was specifically designed and made for the camera. All of this is packaged up in the most beautiful of presentation boxes, including a gorgeously printed book showing the journey of the camera’s design, from concept to reality.

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH in Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The good news for the collector is that there are only 500 of these to be made. As I mentioned earlier, this isn’t one of the ‘normal’ limited editions, but a completely new design of camera, in solid Titanium. Price of such exclusivity is £19,800.00. I’m not really a collector, so don’t know much about such things when looked at as investment, but to me, a completely unique camera does make investment sense. Now, if only I could win the Lottery!

In Use

Thanks to the wonderful folks at Leica UK and the Leica Store Mayfair, I was able to spend a day with the M9 Titanium. Naturally all the testing was done in the office; even if Leica would allow it, I wouldn’t feel comfortable taking such an exclusive and irreplaceable camera out on the street. I need to add though that this camera isn’t part of the 500 but a pre-production proof of concept model; after all, the Leica Stores need to have cameras to show collectors before orders are placed. The one I used had the serial number 6.

Photographer Edmond Terakopian tests the limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo By Brett

In the hand, this camera really feels great. The weight and feel of the materials is just perfect. Aesthetically, I think, it works really beautifully, but the feel of the thing is also spot on. Every part of the body, and that gorgeous lens just work. It’s form, function and material in perfect harmony.

Test images shot with a Leica M9 Titanium. Photographer Brett from the Leica Akademie. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

One of the first things I wanted to see were the new LED illumintaed frame lines in the viewfinder. Traditionally, these are bright-line overlays. In use, these have served me well for a decade; however, in very bright conditions where the subject has a very light coloured background, they can disappear. The M9 Titanium has a completely new system where LEDs are used for illuminating red frame lines. These are much easier to see; very crisp and accurate. It took a few minutes to get used to, but I think I would welcome this system in future M cameras. Aesthetically this removes the need for an illumination window on the front of the camera, adding to a cleaner look.

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. LED bright line frame lines. Unfortunately I couldn't photograph it showing the entire frame, so this image shows the bottom right hand corner. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

One thing which did surprise me was that the frame lines still showed the lens pairings as they have traditionally done, e.g. 28mm and 90mm. I was expecting that the system would show just one set of frames for the mounted lens. I guess though that this would need to read the 6-bit coding to differentiate between the lens pair. Perhaps in the evolution of the M line we shall see this function.

Looking at the outside, one thing which is absent is the manual frame-line selector lever. There are some die-hards on certain forums which mourn it’s loss, but I for one have never found a need for it. I already know the field of view a 50mm is going to give me compared to say a 28mm; the need for changing this manually before choosing lenses is, I think redundant. The M9 Titanium looks so much better and cleaner for not having it.

The Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH is a superb lens; the results just sing. To have it made from Titanium just makes it feel even better in the hand. It’s an absolute joy operating this camera, looking through that superb viewfinder and focusing this gem of a lens; it just feels absolutely spot on.

Test images shot with a Leica M9 Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Apart from the material and design differences, it just handles like an M9; it just feels even better in the hand. I walked around the office taking portraits of some of the folks there and also some shots of the studio and other shots through an open window. I must admit that it’s the first time in my 21 years as a photographer that I’ve felt privileged using a particular camera; it was a real treat.

The Carrying and Holding Concept

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium. The carrying system comprising of the leather holster and the finger loops. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I think one of the obvious things is that this camera will probably never really be used as a photographic tool, but more of a collector’s piece. As a result, I’m looking at these ideas as concepts and not as real world suggestions for working with the camera. As concepts, they are very interesting. The holster is a new approach and is made beautifully out of very high grade leather. I for one would never use it in real life situations though.

The limited edition Leica M9 Titanium, complete with Summilux-M 35mm f1.4 ASPH in Titanium. The finger loop is shown on the bottom left. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The finger loops, which are metal and covered in leather (and come in two sizes) are slightly more usable. The very first time I held the camera (you insert two fingers through the loop), it felt strange but quickly became quite comfortable. With use, one acknowledges that it’s actually quite a neat system and very secure. I would probably opt for the included carrying strap though as I’m just used to having a camera on my shoulder. This new one sided mounting system does away with the traditional strap lugs at either side, again making for a very clean look.

Reality

I would love an M9 Titanium in black paint. I generally shy away from shiny cameras for my work. The less attention, the better considering some of the environments I work in. Titanium is wonderfully strong and light and is the perfect metal for these tools of ours. Alas, it’s expensive and harder to work with, needing special tooling. The M9 Titanium also has a special hard coating which is applied in Switzerland, so this camera, even if mass produced will never be cheap. Still, as a photographer, a black, or very dark and matt coloured Titanium Leica would be fabulous.

Test images shot with a Leica M9 Titanium. Photographer Brett from the Leica Akademie. November 12, 2010. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The current M9 Titanium is a thing of beauty. Everything about it is pure elegance; not just elegance though as it’s combined with absolute usability and stunning design which marries the aesthetic with the practical. As someone who prefers black, I can look at this camera and I still appreciate it’s gorgeous looks and even the colour. How good does it feel? Just think about my earlier comment that it makes the regular M9 feel cheap.

For a set of picture taken with and of the Leica M9 Titanium, please visit my Flickr page.

©Edmond Terakopian