Tag Archives: image

Finalist In TPOTY

Image Chosen As A Finalist In Travel Photographer Of The Year 2012

Hugely delighted to share that an image of mine has been chosen as a finalist in the One Shot, Single Image category of TPOTY, with the theme of ‘Water’.

A heavy downpour of rain soaks pedestrians as they pass an illuminated advertising sign saying “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The judging will take place at the end of November, so fingers crossed!

Nick Ut-Leica Hall of Fame Award


Nick Ut is an AP photographer. Using a Leica, he captured without doubt the most iconic photograph taken to date; the napalm girl, during the Vietnam war. Watch the story behind the famous photograph “The Napalm Girl”.

Nick Ut was honored with the Leica Hall of Fame Award on September 17 at “LEICA – DAS WESENTLICHE” at Photokina 2012.

PR & Commercial Photography

PR Professionals, You Should Bookmark This Page

Alex James, bassist from Blur turned cheesemaker, is launching an exciting, innovative line exclusively with Asda entitled Alex James Presents.The range, on shelves from August 22nd, includes deliciously creamy cheddar blended with wonderful flavour combinations, such as Cheddar and Tomato Ketchup, Cheddar and Salad Cream and Cheddar and Tikka Masala. Alex with a huge sandwich filled with sliced cheeses from the new range. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Picture the scene; your client has spent tens if not hundreds of thousands of pounds on the launch of their latest product or service. They have hired your PR firm to generate interest and spread the word. Months if not years of R&D, planning and hard work have gone into this moment when the product is to be revealed to the public. It’s a make or break moment. You yourself have spent weeks or even months planning, writing press releases, talking of strategies and when it comes to one of the most crucial aspects, the actual reveal to the public, you choose your photographer without much thought and skimp on budget, trying to cut corners for what is a tiny amount in the grand scheme of the project. The result? All this effort and expense goes to waste; the papers don’t give your client coverage, the product fails and you and your company not only look bad, but risk losing that account.

Grey Goose vodka and Virgin Atlantic have today announced the opening of the world’s best airport bar – the Grey Goose Loft at the Virgin Atlantic Clubhouse at London Heathrow. The luxurious bar will offer Virgin Atlantic Upper Class passengers a bespoke experience and a level of service which until now could only be enjoyed in the top cocktail bars in the world. A Grey Goose Signature Dry Martini. London, UK. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I can be of help. I’ve been a press photographer also covering PR and commercial photography since 1989. I’ve weathered two recessions – not through dropping prices or doing silly promotions, but by producing great, award winning photography – consistently. On several occasions my PR photography has made it into the papers’ “Pictures of the Week” and been given the space good photography deserves. I can be involved at the early planning stage by being a consultant (essential and often overlooked), advising on what will make a strong photographic campaign and what the picture editors will go for, all the way through to the actual photography and getting the pictures out there to the papers.

Nell McAndrew wishes UK National Lottery players the best of British luck for the record breaking £100 million EuroMillions rollover jackpot. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

This is a post you should bookmark and even more importantly, here’s my PR and commercial photography website which you definitely should bookmark:

www.commercial.pix.org.uk

I look forward to hearing from you on your next project. Your clients deserve the best photography, so don’t let them down and get in touch.

Feature on the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital (RNOH) in Stanmore ahead of the launch of their fundraising appeal. The Imaging Department is one of the departments that will benefit from the redevelopment. Superintendant Radiographer Marubini Mamphwe carries out a Scoliosis X-Ray on patient David Chapell. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Nik Software Plugins Workflow

Digital Image Processing with Aperture and Nik Software

Here is a recording of my online seminar (webinar from November 30th, 2011) showing how I use Nik Software’s plugins and Aperture for my image processing.
 

Nik Software Webinar

Online Seminar About My Workflow

Image processed using Nik Software's Silver Efex Pro 2 and Aperture. Shot on a Leica X1. Miami skyline as the sun begins to set. June 16, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I’m pleased to announce that I’ll be holding another free online seminar showing my workflow in Aperture, Photoshop and Nik Software’s range of plugins. With each new seminar I use new work, so even if you’ve attended one before, there will be lots of new stuff, so do join in. As always, there will be an opportunity for questions at the end. Hope to see you online 🙂

Thursday, September 29th, 2011 at 19.00 GMT

CLICK HERE TO BOOK!

My Workflow Using Aperture and Nik Software Plugins

My Workflow Using Aperture and Nik Software Plugins from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

A free online webinar workshop hosted by Nik Software. I’ll show how I use Apple’s Aperture in combination with my favourite plugins from Nik Software; Viveza 2, Silver Efex Pro 2 and Sharpener Pro 3. I’ll also demonstrate how the same plugins work within a Photoshop environment. Regardless of which platform you’re on, you should find something of interest as the plugin interfaces and use are practically the same. This is the recording from the webinar on June 7, 2011.

For those who missed the live webinar on June 7th, 2011, here is a recording of the event. Due to it’s format, sadly we’ve had to cut out the Q&A session, so do keep your eyes on this blog and Nik Software’s pages to find out when the next webinar will be.

Storage For Photographers

Your Hard Drive Will Fail;

It’s Just A Question Of When


A yawn is the typical reaction from my colleagues when the topic of digital storage, archiving and backing up is talked about. That is, until one of them loses their work, because they weren’t paying attention to the need for a reliable back-up strategy. The yawns are then replaced by much shouting of obscenities and tears.

In this day and age of digital photography, the obsession of ever increasing megapixels, the need to shoot video and record audio, one thing is for certain; we need somewhere to store it all. The lazy and stupid will leave it all on their laptop until the disk’s full and then drag it off in a hurry, onto an external drive, usually losing stuff. Sometimes they’ll even be stuck on a job with no choice but to delete older stuff just so they can download the latest job and process it. I’ve even seen colleagues work straight of a CF card when in a hurry send a low res jpeg, forget to download the card and then format it. Disaster.

Sonnet Tech Fusion D800 RAID Sata 8 drive external box. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Although it’s a pain, at the end of a long day, it still pays to have a system. My personal way is to never format my CF cards until I have the same work on at least two hard drives. If it’s just on my MacBook Pro, then the CFs remain in my belt pouch until this has been backed up at home. I have a ThinkTank Photo Pixel Pocket Rocket which is always full of CF cards. I make it a point to have more than enough cards with me. I always have one small external hard drive with me too, so I might back up onto this. When on foreign assignments, I carry two external drives and back up onto these (these portable drives are never stored with my laptop. I’ll leave one in my luggage and have the other with me if leaving the laptop in a hotel or car). Once home, after a typical day in town or a trip, I’ll back up the assignment onto my Mac Pro’s Aperture Library.

I’m a big fan of Aperture and have it on all my machines. Apart from RAW processing, Aperture also acts as a fully searchable image database. At the moment I have more than 385,000 images in my Aperture library, and this number is constantly growing. RAW images are stored on an internal drive, in separate Project folders which are derived from the assignment. These are titled using a date and a name. An example would be “2009-09-28 Gordon Brown”. These Projects (with consolidated masters) are then backed up onto a Sonnet Technologies external SATA RAID box (more on which later). The same Project is also backed up onto an external hard drive which is kept off-site. It’s important to have off-site storage to secure the safety of data in the event of fire or theft. Lastly, important images, documents, video and audio are backed up to “The Cloud” (more on which later).

What’s New?

The old ways to back up were CDs and then DVDs. Blu-Ray doesn’t seem to have caught on, even though a double sided disc offers 50Gb of storage. The problem with optical storage, apart from the slow speed of writing, is that they don’t seem to have the longevity needed. I’ve had top brand CDs, kept upright in their cases and stored in cool, dark and dry conditions become unreadable after a few years. There is a 500Gb optical disc that’s being talked about, but again, how long is any media stored on that going to last? I for one certainly hope that it has proper archival stability, as it really would be useful to have.

My thoughts are that using several hard drives which are swapped out every three to four years, is the best method available. This provides speed and security. It also offers value for money, as drive prices continue to fall, with speed and capacities rising.                 

External Seagate hard drives, with Western Digital drives in background. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

If you’re wondering why I seem to have an obsession with several hard drives, and a golden rule that everything is kept on three drives at least, it’s because hard drives fail. It’s an absolute given. Anyone in IT will tell you that hard drives fail, it’s just a question of when. I’ve personally had a major brand name drive fail after 3 months of use whilst sat on a desk, but had others which have worked solidly for many years. It’s always a gamble, and you should be well prepared.

At the moment, I have 12 external drives in my office and all the associated cabling and power bricks cluttering up the floor area. After some research, I recently decided to go for a Sonnet D800 Fusion RAID ( www.sonnettech.com ). This is an external SATA RAID box with eight drive bays. This means that it will hold eight hard drives, connect to my MacPro (its multi platform) using eSATA cables (connecting to its own controller card which installs inside your computer) which means that it’s blisteringly fast, and has only three cables; two eSATA cables and one power cable. To say that it’s a neat and tidy solution would be an understatement. I’ve recently finished moving my archive over to this system and will do away with most of the external drives. This also makes the office more quite and power-efficient.

I have the drives in the D800 set up in pairs of RAID 1 (also known as Mirror RAID). This basically means that everything that is saved on the drive (and you will only see one of the drives on your computer), is automatically copied onto its partnered drive. This is transparent, automatic and at the same speed. This protects the data from a hardware failure. I then manually back up data from this unit onto an external drive via FW800. This ensures that if by accident I erase an image, or an image gets corrupted, I can get it back from this back-up. These back-up drives are then stored off-site.

In use the system is amazing. Accessing images or video on the unit is blisteringly fast as it’s working over SATA, which is much quicker than even FW800. I’ve had the unit running for weeks without powering down and it’s been absolutely stable on the Mac Pro running Leopard.

The other new term you may have heard is “The Cloud”. This is virtual storage that’s kept on servers, somewhere in the internet, sometimes even in different countries. The Cloud’s not such a new thing, but with faster broadband, it’s now becoming more usable. Apple has had “.Mac” (now called “Mobile Me” www.me.com ) for years. Part of this service has been the iDisk which has been a virtual drive, available for use by Mac and PC users. I’ve been using this system for many years, and although a little slow, it’s been solid and stable.

The other Cloud system I’ve been using for around a year is Amazon’s S3 via Jungle Disk ( www.jungledisk.com ). This mounts a virtual drive onto your desktop (it’s multi platform) and allows you to use it like any other drive. It’s a faster system than iDisk and allows you to pay for the storage you use. At the time of writing, this is $0.15 per Gb per month. Your data is then saved on Amazon’s servers either in the USA or in Europe at locations which are not disclosed.

I’ve been using the Cloud in two ways. When on assignment, if I’ve shot a particularly important image, I’ve been saving them immediately to my iDisk. This has been for back-up purposes. Also, if I’ve got documents to which I need access, as well as having copies with me, I’ve also got them on my iDisk. This also includes email and FTP account details, which means if my laptop gets stolen, I can still function by accessing this information from another machine.                                                                                              

Screenshot from an Apple Mac running OS X showing Jungle Disk which is used for accessing Amazon S3’s Cloud service.

As my working year continues, every few weeks, I upload the edited pictures from assignments to my Amazon S3 drive. At the end of the year, like most photographers, I look through that year’s work and select my best work for competitions. Once I have this edit sorted, and the images processed to perfection, I take the contents of this folder and also upload it to Amazon S3. This gives me an off-site back-up of the year’s de facto most important and best work.

Lastly, a word on automated back-ups. I use Apple’s Time Machine to back up everything apart from my work images. This includes emails, invoices, letters, music, family snaps and so on. It’s saved me twice so far after I accidentally deleted important information. You can get back-up software for any platform, and I urge you to also have this system in place. For me, I use a separate FW800 drive for this purpose.

One thing’s for sure; as prices tumble for memory cards and hard drives, there’s no excuse not to have a solid and dependable back-up strategy. A little time spent planning and executing this strategy will save much stress and tears; trust me, I’ve seen enough colleagues suffer.

This article was originally published in the BJP on October 07, 2009.