Category Archives: newspaper

The Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 Lens Hands On Preview

Seven Weeks With The Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 (Pre-Production) Lens

Pre-production Panasonic Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 L-Mount Full-Frame Lens, attached to a Lumix S1 camera. London, UK. August 27, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A self portrait, showing a pre-production Panasonic Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 L-Mount full-frame lens, mounted on a Lumix S1 and a Uniqball ball head. London, UK. August 25, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

“Mmmmm, this is going to be special”. This was what I said to myself as soon as I looked at the the very first test frame I shot with the lens on my Lumix S1R. Followed by, “Its so sharp!”. This was a very good way to start shooting with a brand new lens. In fact, a pre-production model at that, with early, pre-production firmware.

Eunsley Park, award-winning British, South Korean violinist, with a Lorenzo Storioni violin, from the 1800s (from the Beare’s International Violin Society). Walkway by a construction site, Ealing, London, UK. July 29, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Eunsley Park, award-winning British, South Korean violinist, with a Lorenzo Storioni violin, from the 1800s (from the Beare’s International Violin Society). Walkway by a construction site, Ealing, London, UK. July 29, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

I felt rather honoured when Panasonic Lumix UK got in touch to see if I’d like to test out the unreleased S Pro 24-70mm f2.8, ahead of it’s global launch on August 28th, 2019, which was around 1.5 months away. Unboxing the generic brown box, cutting away the bubble wrap, revealed the new lens. I found out the lens had been carried by hand, all the way from Japan! I got out some black tape, covered up all the markings and began shooting.

Entertainer and clown Christina Petre. Armenian Summer Festival, North Acton Playing Fields, Eastfields Road, London, UK. July 14, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It’s a bit of a special feeling knowing only a handful of people globally have seen the lens and I’ve been asked to test it and make images with it to be possibly used for the global launch. It’s also quite stressful, knowing photographs have to be made to not only showcase, but live up to every aspect of what was already proving to be a spectacularly good lens.

Portrait of Stephen Unwin (theatre and opera director, writer and teacher) at home. London, UK. July 15, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

One of the characteristics that hit me as I begun shooting more and more, was that this wasn’t just a sharp lens, but it had something special. Pure clinical sharpness is ok for forensic type photography, but for being creative, for conveying mood, for sharing a story, one also needs gentleness, subtlety and grace. The rendering from this lens has all of that.

Jan Hellebrand assembles a mechanical clock after a full dissasembly and service. The Clock Gallery, Pitshanger Lane, Ealing, London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Generally, a 24-70mm f2.8, is a bread and butter lens; pretty much everyone will have one in their bag and it’s the standard professional zoom. Versatile, useful and a safe choice. What I found special though, was this wasn’t just a bread and butter lens. Where one may have a standard zoom for safety, one would also have a special prime with nicer rendering, for making those special portraits or creative shots.

In Armenian mythology, the pomegranate is celebrated as a symbol of life and is also believed to keep us safe from evil spirits. It has religious connotations to Christianity and is seen as the blood of Christ. The mythology of ancient Greece regarded this fruit as the symbol of life, marriage and rebirth. The fruit is also used as a holy symbol and respected in zoroastrian worshipping ceremonies and rituals.The pomegranate symbolises the soul’s immortality and the perfection of nature for Zoroastrians. For Muslims, the pomegranate is also a symbol of beauty, it is said to give beauty to those who eat it. Prophet Mohammed has advised pregnant women to eat pomegranates if they wanted beautiful children. Placement of pomegranate trees in the gardens of Eden, brings meaning for Muslims, who as a result believe that it is a holy tree. The Jewish mysticism called Kabbala reveres the pomegranate in many of its rituals. In modern Turkey today, many families throw a pomegranate on the floor and “crack” it on the New Year’s Eve to have a plentiful new year. Pomegranate still life. London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Well, the S 24-70mm f2.8 has all of that. It’s truly special to have all these qualities wrapped up in one lens. Versatility and speed, but also beautiful rendering, colour, contrast, detail and well, a bit of poetry too. I found it captured light and colour beautifully and rendered a nicely soft background in out of focus areas. As much as I hate talking about this and using the word bokeh, it does have beautiful bokeh! (I need to add my dislike is purely based on people who only care about bokeh and nothing else, especially not the craft of photography).

A Piccadilly Ballerina Jonquil timepiece, modelled by Mona Ali. British luxury timepiece creator Backes & Strauss (founded in 1789). 21-22 Grosvenor Street, Mayfair, London, UK. July 17, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It is chunky though. I felt the same way as when I first picked up the S Pro 50mm f1.4. Although I wished all of the S Series lenses could be a little smaller, just as with the S 50mm, as soon as I started shooting with the S 24-70mm, it justified it’s size and won a place in my camera bag. In fact, I pretty much didn’t shoot with anything else and seven weeks on, it’s always been mounted on either my S1 or S1R.

The horses are cooled down with water after the match. King Power Gold Cup polo match between Emlor and Murus Sanctus. Cowdray Park Polo Club, Ambersham & Brooks Field Grounds, Selham, West Sussex. July 10, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

It just produces beautiful images and no matter what type of subject I point it at, it does as I ask and produces what I want. Fast to react and precise in rendering.

Fashion designer and independent British luxury brand, Joshua Kane, in his flagship store at 68 Great Portland Street, London, UK. July 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Super fast and silent AF, outstanding build quality and stunning optics. I have a feeling the scientific types at DxO Labs are going to enjoy putting this through their rigorous tests.

Hans Staartjes with his hand built indoor free flight rubber powered model airplane, known as an “F1D” class (internationally recognised flight duration competitions since the 1960’s). The model has a wing span of 55cm and weigh 1.4 grams. The model is balsa reinforced by very fine boron filaments and covered in the lightest film available, called OS film. London, UK. July 05, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
A portrait of German television host Max (Dieter) Moor. Inauguration of Lumen, the Museum of Mountain Photography, at 2275m, perched atop Mount Kronplatz-Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

So please don’t read this small post as a review; it really is a quick preview. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. Keep in mind though that this is a pre-production lens with early, non final firmware and so is definitely a pre-release lens. Yet, it helped make these images with grace. I can’t wait to get my hands on the final thing! If you have an L Mount camera, I suggest you try it too!

Italian Alpine (Mountain Troop) soldiers at the top of Kronplatz mountain. Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Traditional Armenian Sunday Worship conducted by Rev. Shnork Bagdassarian. St Sarkis Armenian Apostolic church (the Grade II listed building was constructed in 1922 and is the only church in England to have been built in the traditional Armenian style). Iverna Gardens, Kensington, London, UK. July 07, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

I’ll be sharing some pictures in the coming weeks on my Instagram @terakopian.

More S Pro 24-70mm Photographs

You can also find two albums of photographs on my Flickr:

Photographs Shot On The New Panasonic Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 Lens

Panasonic Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 Lens Product Shots and Comparison

The Queen Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace, London, UK. July 07, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Dancers from the London based Akhtamar Dance Group. Armenian Summer Festival, North Acton Playing Fields, Eastfields Road, London, UK. July 14, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
A lady photographs her friend using a smartphone. Upper deck of the Snog frozen yoghurt bus. South Bank, London, UK. July 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO
Summer Flowers. Ealing Common, London, UK. July 11, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian ***Photo taken using a pre-production Lumix S 24-70mm f2.8 lens, running early firmware. This lens is not a final production sample*** COPYRIGHT PHOTO

Having just watched the Livestream from Hollywood, launching the Lumix S1H and S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens, thrilled to see one of my images shown by Yosuke Yamane-san, the head of imaging at Panasonic.

A photograph by Edmond Terakopian projected during the Lumix global launch event for the Lumix S1H and S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens. Dolby Vine Theatre, Hollywood, LA, CA, USA. August 27, 2019. Video Grab: ©Panasonic

BPPA Assignments 2019 Exhibition

Thrilled to have two of my photographs selected by the curators of the BPPA’s (British Press Photographers’ Association) tremendously powerful and not to be missed, Assignments 2019 exhibition. The show is beautifully curated and thanks has to be given to the talented team of curators, comprised of some of the brightest beacons in the photojournalism industry. Many thanks to Tom Stoddart, John Downing, Nikki Sutherland, Lawrence Lustig and Julie Edwards.

The private view and opening of the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

At the private view of the exhibition, it was an absolute joy to meet Fleet Street’s legendary press photographer John Downing for the first time. He had been a huge inspiration for me and my ethos of never being without a camera came from reading about his work. When a colleague pointed out my photograph (The Joys Of Life), it was an absolute honour to hear him kindly praise the image, saying it was one that he had chosen personally and to hear his kind compliments about the composition, timing and light, pushed me to blush!

Photographer Edmond Terakopian beside “The Joys Of Life”, which was one of two images selected for the exhibition and legendary press photographer John Downing (on right) who was also one of the curators of the show. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo ©
The Joys Of Life. A child runs around during a heat wave bank holiday, whilst bathed in rays of sunlight in the turbine hall of the Tate Modern, Bankside, London, UK. May 06, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

This photograph was made on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 50-200mm lens. The raw image was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment was finished in Nik Collection’s Silver Efex Pro on an Apple Mac Pro and fully calibrated Eizo CG monitors.

My photograph “The Joys Of Life” (centre), was one of two images selected for the exhibition by the curators. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The second image kindly chosen by the curators was of a homeless man, seemingly passed out from wine, after another hard day on the streets.

The UK faces a homeless epidemic, with statistics showing that a homeless person dies every two weeks in London, one of the world’s wealthiest cities. Spiralling property prices are being cited as a huge factor, alongside access to mental health services becoming harder over the last several years. A homeless man lays on the street, apparently passed out from drinking the wine tied to the top of his belongings on his trolley. His guitar, probably used to busk with to pay for the wine, still strapped to his back. Another homeless man, wrapped in a sleeping bag, walks by. Tesco superstore, Pentonville Road, London, UK. March 21, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Photographer Edmond Terakopian beside his image of a homeless man, was one of two images selected for the exhibition by the curators. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Tracy Howl

The photograph was shot on a Sony RX1RII camera. The raw image was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment was finished in Alienskin Exposure X3, on an Apple Mac Pro and fully calibrated Eizo CG monitors.

BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition is on from 17th to 19th May, 2019, at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, on all four floors. 

BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Contact Sheets at the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A poster for the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Assignments will also travel to The Potteries Museum and Art gallery in Stoke, from Sat 13th July to Sun 25th August.

An Assignments 2019 book will also soon be available, so keep an eye on the BPPA Shop to get a copy!

Discrimination In Journalism

Seeking Diversity In The Media Industry

Press Card Mosaic

It’s a very sad truth that sexism and racism is rife in the media. As a British photojournalist born in Iran and off Armenian descendants, I have lived in the UK since the age of eight. It’s very much my home and I’m extremely proud to be British and to contribute to society through my work, both professionally and in various volunteer basis, as well as numerous charitable contributions.

Through various publications, competitions and awards over the years, I have proven my ability as a photojournalist, yet sadly have never managed to make it past being a casual freelance photographer (meaning being commissioned daily) for the newspapers and agencies. I have several talented colleagues who are of various ethnic backgrounds who have the same struggles. The same discrimination is shown towards white, English female colleagues when contracts and big projects are filled. It is indeed rare to see someone of ethnicity or female photographers in good contract positions, the recipient of the top commissions or in possession of staff jobs (even when these were more abundant).

It truly is a shame that one’s ability and skill is often overseen, in place of one’s ethnicity or sex. After all, the reader or viewer sees the work, not the author. Its quite bizarre that over the last year, I decided to grow a long beard. Instead of this being seen as a trendy or hipster type thing, because of my slight tanned complexion, I could see a lot of people were judging me as some sort of religious extremist. Since shaving it off a couple of months ago, the reaction of the same people when seeing me is the polar opposite. Its quite sad really. Ignorance is most often not bliss.

Picture editors, editors, publishers and media owners need to look at the quality of work and ability of the photojournalist, not their ethnicity, sex, cultural background or religion. I’m definitely not one to condone positive discrimination either; quotas shouldn’t be filled based purely on one’s ethnicity or sex. I just think that the best person for the job should always get the job regardless of the colour of their skin or their sex.

The NY Times has this excellent article, which is well worth a read: Seeking Action — Not Just Talk — About Diversity in Photojournalism. Even more importantly, at the end of the article is a link to a survey for working photojournalists. Please put aside five minutes and fill in this Reclaim survey. Hopefully it’ll benefit the industry and our readers too.

BBC Interview On Iconic Photography

Live Interview On BBC World News

IMG_1843

Thrilled to have permission from the BBC to share this clip of myself and journalism student Wilton Jackson from the University of Baton Rouge being interviewed on a segment about iconic photography.

The segment was based around the superb photograph from the Baton Rouge protest (July 10th, 2016) by Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman.

This clip is being used with full permission of the BBC (Global Planning Editor, BBC News, London). This was a live broadcast on July 21st, 2016.

IMG_1842

Staging and Manipulation

How Far Can Photojournalists Go?

Professional Photographer Magazine May 2016

During the Photography Show earlier this year, I was part of a discussion panel for Professional Photography magazine along with my talented friend and colleague Paul Sanders and the talented Elisabeth Blanchet and Martin Middlebrook. It was a fascinating hour long discussion on staging, manipulation, ethics, the press and photojournalism. I’m happy to share that the text from the discussion is featured in the May issue of Professional Photography magazine, over six pages, which is now on sale.

You can get a copy of the May issue, or a subscription to the magazine HERE. Hope you enjoy the read and feel free to carry the discussion on here in the comments section if you wish.

A Note To Editors, Publishers And Newspaper Owners

How To Succeed In The Newspaper Industry

It’s alarming to see in recent years the closure of photographic departments (e.g. the Chicago Sun Times and countless weekly local papers) and the way great photography is cut from once brilliant newspapers. If someone with no understanding of newspapers, or business generally, wants to cut costs and increase profitability, the simple and easy thing to do is get rid of what costs the most; often this is the photographic department. The reasons are simple; camera gear and computer gear, including software, is expensive and sending photographers all over the country and the world accumulates in cost. After all, unlike journalists who can work many thousands of miles from a story, rewriting press releases or doing interviews over the phone, the photographer has to be there, in person. This is one of the aspects which makes photography the truest form of journalism; you can’t photograph what you can’t witnessA photograph is the only unaltered truth from a story.

State visit to Britain by US President Barack Obama.  Karl Court & Andrew Parsons in the press area. Downing Street, London. May 25, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

State visit to Britain by US President Barack Obama. Carl Court & Andrew Parsons in the press area. Downing Street, London. May 25, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

So, easy, let’s cut out or cut down the photography department and use user generated content; a big mistake; putting aside that often these are aesthetically weak and do not communicate the story, the source of the imagery is also unknown and therefore cannot be trusted. A good and unfortunate example is the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing where the Police were chasing the wrong suspects as they were led astray by “citizen journalists”. The other option is of course to use the wire services; excellent agencies like AP are journalistically, ethically and morally sound, often producing great content. Only problem is, this content’s available to all your competitors, blogs (both proper or run by individuals as a glorified hobby) and available for free on search engines.

There is also the option of giving iPhones to the reporters; after all, anybody can take a picture, right? Wrong! Many more people write than take photographs, so by this frankly idiotic reasoning, newspapers should certainly get rid of all writers as well.

Anyone can take a picture; just as anyone can write a word, sing a song, write a poem, paint a painting, run, jump, kick a ball, make a paper aeroplane; it doesn’t mean that they can do these things well, let alone properly and at a high level. It certainly doesn’t make these people photographers, journalists, singers, poets, artists, athletes, professional footballers or aeronautical designers and engineers. When it comes to things journalistic, a level of trust is needed as it’s important to get the facts right, be they in words or in pictures. Relying on pictures from bystanders (even if the term Citizen Journalist has come about, it doesn’t mean bystanders have the first idea about journalistic practice, value or ethics) and publishing these is a tragic mistake for all the various reasons outlined.

State visit to Britain by US President Barack Obama.  Photographers setting up remote cameras in order to get a second angle to their shooting positions. Downing Street, London. May 25, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

State visit to Britain by US President Barack Obama. Photographers setting up remote cameras in order to get a second angle to their shooting positions. Downing Street, London. May 25, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

At this point, you’ve ruined the quality of your newspaper and at best made it generic and at worst made it awful. Content is king. At this point, any businessman will tell you that you never mess with the essence of your product; you product is what keeps the company afloat. Give the consumer a reason not buy your product and they will stop buying. Loads of options there on the free market. Result? Your sales go down, advertisers at first barter for cheaper rates and then stop advertising. Your newspaper fails and closes. Whoops.

Look at the Daily Mail website and how astonishingly popular it is; ask yourselves why? Is it because many millions like to read the paper’s occasional almost racist stance on things or is it because the paper’s web presence has embraced photography and publishes the best photography available, daily, and thus pushes up it’s visitor numbers and has elevated the website to being one of the most popular in the world, often overtaking the NY Times? Clearly, it’s not the writing, it’s the power of photography.

So, “How To Succeed”. Dear editor, publisher or newspaper owner, people are moved by great photography. It catches their eye on the news stand and online and attracts them to your paper and the story. People never remember a great article they read months ago or a great piece of video footage from years ago. They will however remember pictures they saw decades ago. This is how a human being’s mind works and as this is your target audience, you should pay attention to the power of great photography and the effect it has. Just because you see great iPhone pictures produced by professional photographers, it doesn’t mean giving your reporters an iPhone is going to bring similar results. Just as a keyboard doesn’t make people award winning writers and a pot doesn’t make everyone a Michelin Star chef, a camera (be it a Leica, Canon, Olympus or an iPhone) doesn’t make everyone a photographer.

BRITAIN MANDELA 90TH BIRTHDAY CONCERT

In it’s day, The Independent was a great paper. It ran powerful, intelligent photography. They saved costs, got rid of the country’s best photographers. Now look at what the paper’s turned into; such a shame, such a waste. Realise that great photography and writing go hand in hand; marry this with great design and you have a winning formula.

This philosophy applies to local weekly, regional, evening, and national papers. Respect your readership and give them good material and they will stay true to you.

Now, go and hire some great photographers, produce a great newspaper, win awards, be proud, sell loads of copies, get many hits on your website, sell adverts and make your many, many millions.

Addendum:

As if proof were needed: The Chicago Sun-Times has now hired back four of the photographers it fired. Good to see that eventually they came to their senses (probably spurred on by a loss in advertising revenue) and realised what a vital role quality and journalistically accurate photography plays in a newspaper. More HERE

Commended; Nikon Videographer Of The Year

UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards 2013

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | http://www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | http://www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

Kate Silverton at the Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

Kate Silverton at the Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | http://www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

Huge congratulations to all the winners at the UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards evening at the Honourable Artillery Company in London. Some truly amazing photography was shown, recognised and appreciated.

Edmond Terakopian with his commended award for the Nikon Videographer of the Year category. The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

Edmond Terakopian with his commended award for the Nikon Videographer of the Year category. The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | http://www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

The Picture Editors Guild Awards 2013. The Honourable Artillery Company, London. November 04, 2013. Photo: Nick Ray | http://www.nickrayphotography.co.uk

I’m pleased to say I made the shortlist and was commended in the Nikon Videographer of the Year category for my short documentary film on the Electric Coffee Company in Ealing, west London.

There will be an exhibition of the photographs (sadly not including the short films) at the Museum of London, from today (November 6th) to the 16th of March 2014. For more details please visit their website.

Many thanks to the fabulous Nick Ray for providing some photographs from the evening.

On a technical note, the video was shot using a Leica M (Type 240) and Leica lenses. For more details on the tools used, please see my earlier post on this.