Tag Archives: bppa

BPPA Assignments 2019 Exhibition

Thrilled to have two of my photographs selected by the curators of the BPPA’s (British Press Photographers’ Association) tremendously powerful and not to be missed, Assignments 2019 exhibition. The show is beautifully curated and thanks has to be given to the talented team of curators, comprised of some of the brightest beacons in the photojournalism industry. Many thanks to Tom Stoddart, John Downing, Nikki Sutherland, Lawrence Lustig and Julie Edwards.

The private view and opening of the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

At the private view of the exhibition, it was an absolute joy to meet Fleet Street’s legendary press photographer John Downing for the first time. He had been a huge inspiration for me and my ethos of never being without a camera came from reading about his work. When a colleague pointed out my photograph (The Joys Of Life), it was an absolute honour to hear him kindly praise the image, saying it was one that he had chosen personally and to hear his kind compliments about the composition, timing and light, pushed me to blush!

Photographer Edmond Terakopian beside “The Joys Of Life”, which was one of two images selected for the exhibition and legendary press photographer John Downing (on right) who was also one of the curators of the show. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo ©
The Joys Of Life. A child runs around during a heat wave bank holiday, whilst bathed in rays of sunlight in the turbine hall of the Tate Modern, Bankside, London, UK. May 06, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

This photograph was made on a Panasonic Lumix G9 and Leica DG 50-200mm lens. The raw image was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment was finished in Nik Collection’s Silver Efex Pro on an Apple Mac Pro and fully calibrated Eizo CG monitors.

My photograph “The Joys Of Life” (centre), was one of two images selected for the exhibition by the curators. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The second image kindly chosen by the curators was of a homeless man, seemingly passed out from wine, after another hard day on the streets.

The UK faces a homeless epidemic, with statistics showing that a homeless person dies every two weeks in London, one of the world’s wealthiest cities. Spiralling property prices are being cited as a huge factor, alongside access to mental health services becoming harder over the last several years. A homeless man lays on the street, apparently passed out from drinking the wine tied to the top of his belongings on his trolley. His guitar, probably used to busk with to pay for the wine, still strapped to his back. Another homeless man, wrapped in a sleeping bag, walks by. Tesco superstore, Pentonville Road, London, UK. March 21, 2018. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Photographer Edmond Terakopian beside his image of a homeless man, was one of two images selected for the exhibition by the curators. BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Tracy Howl

The photograph was shot on a Sony RX1RII camera. The raw image was processed in Adobe Lightroom and the monochrome treatment was finished in Alienskin Exposure X3, on an Apple Mac Pro and fully calibrated Eizo CG monitors.

BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition is on from 17th to 19th May, 2019, at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, on all four floors. 

BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
Contact Sheets at the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A poster for the BPPA Assignments 2019 photography exhibition (on from 17th to 19th May, 2019) at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, London, UK. May 16, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Assignments will also travel to The Potteries Museum and Art gallery in Stoke, from Sat 13th July to Sun 25th August.

An Assignments 2019 book will also soon be available, so keep an eye on the BPPA Shop to get a copy!

The BPPA & The Leveson Inquiry

British Press Photographers’ Association Applies To Speak At The Leveson Inquiry

The BPPA today wrote to the Leveson Inquiry and asked to be added to the list of those giving evidence. We did this because of the one-way traffic from witnesses criticising photographers and because of the dreadfully lazy television journalism that has painted each and every one of us as the worst kind of citizen paparazzi. This is what we said:

Initial submission to The Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practice & ethics of the press by The British Press Photographers’ Association:

Introduction

The British Press Photographers’ Association (The BPPA) has amongst its membership a large percentage of the country’s front line news photographers. Founded in 1984 to ‘promote and inspire the highest ethical, technical and creative standards from within the profession’, The BPPA has a unique perspective on the current practices and market place for press photographs in the United Kingdom. Press photographers led the way when it came to establishing the guidelines by which all UK Police forces (via ACPO) work alongside the media in the field and we would endeavour to bring a similar problem solving approach to the Inquiry.

Request to be added to the list of Core Participants

In the light of the nature of the evidence being given to The Inquiry by various celebrity witnesses, the association’s board took the decision that we needed to make a submission and to seek to give evidence in person. In reading the list of persons and organisations that may be considered as Core Participants, the association believes that the weight of commentary during the opening weeks of the Inquiry makes press photographers “subject to explicit or significant criticism during the inquiry proceedings or in its report.” In the light of this, we would contend that The BPPA is able to give evidence on the issues of culture, practices and ethics, which the Inquiry might not otherwise be able to obtain.

The BPPA can speak for press photographers who, because of the highly fragmented nature of our employment may well speak to the BPPA when they would not speak to the Inquiry. The Inquiry should know that our membership breaks down as follows:

• Directly employed – 24%

• Employed on fixed or rolling contracts 12%

• Working through agencies as freelance photographers 18%

• Entirely freelance 46%

As a profession attracting a great deal of criticism we would further contend that such a diverse group will not be represented in an equitable and fair way at an inquiry where such representation is both vital for a large and key group of professionals, and for the Inquiry’s ability to hear and consider the widest range of informed opinions.

Press photographers are, for various reasons, the very visible face of the UK print media. Because of this we are regularly subjected to false attribution and accusations as well as verbal abuse from members of the public and from a significant number of people who work in the celebrity, entertainment and even law and order industries. The continuous use of pejorative terms such as ‘paparazzi’ about the widest spectrum of news photographers harms our collective reputations.

Our Evidence

The BPPA would seek to provide evidence on the following:

• The culture and practices of professional press photographers

• The market place for news pictures and how it affects those cultures and practices

• The problems that the market for celebrity images is causing

• The dangers of introducing French style privacy laws

• The need for cooperation between all parts of the media to establish clear and enforceable ethical guidelines and codes of behaviour and etiquette

• Our proposals to help control the problems of unethical photographers and citizen journalists with cameras

The association believes that it would be able to make a very positive contribution to The Inquiry by providing a more accurate, up-to-date and informed assessment than any other organisation on the specific topics where we have expertise.