Category Archives: Film

The Taste Awards 2013

NOMINEES & HONOREES: 5TH ANNUAL TASTE AWARDS

Taste Awards-Nominee-5thAnn-LOGO

Very pleased to share that my short film on the Electric Coffee Company has been nominated in the 5th Annual Taste Awards in the “Best Mini Film or Documentary” section.

As the film is nominated in the Viewers Choice category, voting for the film is open to the public until December 18, 2013. If you like my short film, I would really appreciate if you would take a minute or two and vote for it; thank you.

CLICK HERE to vote for my film ūüôā My film is in Section 11 and titled “Electric Coffee Company”.

Many thanks for your support. The results will be announced at the Taste Awards in Hollywood on January 16th, 2014.

Some frame grabs from the film:

Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013. Electric Coffee Company, Ealing, London. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian / 2013.

My First Leica M (Type 240) Video

Short Film On The Electric Coffee Company

Electric Coffee Company (FilmConvert Grade) from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

Pleased to share my first short film shot entirely on the new Leica M (Type 240) camera. For the project at the Electric Coffee Company, I used the Leica 28mm Summicron ASPH, 35mm Summilux ASPH FLE and 50mm Noctilux ASPH, with some of the closeup shots being done with the aid of a Leica OUFRO macro adapter. Interview audio was done on a Roland R26 and Rode lavalier microphone. The reportage shots were all done using a Manfrotto 561BHDV video monopod and the interview was shot on a Gitzo video tripod. I also used a Lee RF75 filter holder and Lee ND filters for some shots.

I do hope you like the film, and if you have, would really appreciate if you could vote for it in the Film Convert competition; it’s just one click without registration needed. Thanks.

The editing was done on Apple’s FCP X with several shots being graded in Color by colourist Neil Patience. The final film then had it’s final grading done using Film Convert.

Sebasti√£o Salgado: Genesis

The Unspoilt Planet

Sebasti√£o Salgado: Genesis from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

In 2004, Sebastião began the Genesis project, aimed at presenting the unblemished face of nature and humanity. Genesis consists of a series of landscape and wildlife photographs, as well as photographs of human communities that continue to live in accordance with their ancestral traditions and cultures, shot across 32 countries, over an eight year period. This body of work was conceived as a potential path to humanity’s rediscovery of itself in nature.

World premiere of Sebastiao Salgado's Genesis Exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, UK. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

World premiere of Sebastiao Salgado’s Genesis Exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, UK. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Sebastião Salgado’s photographic exhibition Genesis is unveiled for its world premiere at the Natural History Museum on Thursday 11 April (and will run until September 8th, 2013). Edited, designed and curated by Lélia Wanick Salgado, the exhibition includes 200 epic black-and-white photographs that celebrate the majesty of nature and examine the balance of human relationships with our fragile planet.

World premiere of Sebasti√£o Salgado's Genesis Exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, UK. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

World premiere of Sebasti√£o Salgado’s Genesis Exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, UK. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Accompanying the exhibition is an equally amazing book published by Taschen. For the collector, there are bigger, limited edition volumes, with photographic prints.

Since elephants are hunted by poachers in Zambia, they are scared of humans and vehicles. Alarmed when they see an approaching car, they usually run quickly into the bush.  Kafue National Park. Zambia. July and August 2010. Photo: © Sebastião SALGADO / Amazonas images/nbpictures

Since elephants are hunted by poachers in Zambia, they are scared of humans and vehicles. Alarmed when they see an approaching car, they usually run quickly into the bush. Kafue National Park. Zambia. July and August 2010. Photo: © Sebastião SALGADO / Amazonas images/nbpictures

Speaking about the exhibition, Sebasti√£o Salgado commented, ‚ÄėGenesis is about beginnings. It is about the unspoiled planet, the most pristine parts, and a way of life that is traditional and in harmony with nature. I wanted to present places that were untouched and remain so to this day.

World premiere of Sebasti√£o Salgado's Genesis Exhibition, Natural History Museum, London. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

World premiere of Sebasti√£o Salgado’s Genesis Exhibition, Natural History Museum, London. April 09, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

I want people to see our planet in another way, to feel moved and be brought closer to it. I want them to become more conscious of the environment, to feel respect for nature because this is something that is relevant to everyone.’

Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel.  At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice.  The Antarctic Peninsula. January and February 2005. Photo: © Sebastião SALGADO / Amazonas images/nbpictures

Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula. January and February 2005. Photo: © Sebastião SALGADO / Amazonas images/nbpictures

Sebasti√£o Salgado¬†was a driving force behind me taking up photography as a career. When I first saw his image, often referred to as “the crucifix” from the open gold mine in Brazil, I was totally stunned; my mind and eyes were opened like never before, as I discovered a new way of seeing and an epic way of using a camera to convey a story. Personally I have never looked back. They say, one should never meet one’s heroes as disappointment is guaranteed. I’m thankful to say that when I met¬†Sebasti√£o Salgado and his wife, curator and editor¬†L√©lia Wanick Salgado at their book signing in Taschen’s London store, it was a special moment. Genuinely lovely, passionate and talented with absolute modesty and elegance. My career has always been inspired by the work and now I’m glad to say that it continues to be inspired by the person too.

Sebasti√£o Salgado: Genesis book signing.   Photographer Sebasti√£o Salgado. TASCHEN Store London, 12 Duke of York Square, London. April 10, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Sebasti√£o Salgado: Genesis book signing. Photographer Sebasti√£o Salgado. TASCHEN Store London, 12 Duke of York Square, London. April 10, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

As a press launch (just like a private view) is never the best time to see an exhibition; one’s always busy working. From the parts of the exhibition I did manage to see, I cannot recommend this exhibition highly enough. I foresee that I’ll be visiting it several times over the coming weeks and months. It should be on everyone’s “to do” list. It is quite literally awesome. I also cannot recommend the book highly enough either. It’s an amazing body of work, with an extremely important message. Go see it.

Addendum: I went to see the exhibition and spent several hours wondering around the various rooms, exploring various aspects of the project. It is magnificent. Amazing imagery, amazing prints and very well curated too. One gets really drawn into the images, discovering amazing details and subtleties. Equally, stepping back from some of the images, brings the graphic elements of the composition to play. I cannot recommend this exhibition highly enough. Book your ticket and time slot and visit; it is quite literally awesome.

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis book signing.   L-R: Lélia Wanick Salgado (wife, curator & editor of the book) and photographer Sebastião Salgado. TASCHEN Store London, 12 Duke of York Square, London. April 10, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis book signing. L-R: Lélia Wanick Salgado (wife, curator & editor of the book) and photographer Sebastião Salgado. TASCHEN Store London, 12 Duke of York Square, London. April 10, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Behind The Scenes

On Assignment In Vancouver

A short video of me on assignment covering Virgin Atlantic’s inaugural flight to¬†Vancouver with Sir Richard Branson (Founder and President of Virgin Atlantic) and Olympic gold medallist Amy Williams.¬†

On Assignment, Vancouver 2012 from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.

Video by Andy Reik, Dust*

Photos by Edmond Terakopian

With thanks to Leon Schlesinger, TVC

Additional Audio by Simon White, Airtime TV

A set of photographs from this assignment can be viewed on my Flickr Stream.

Gunter Sachs Collection at Sotheby’s

An Exclusive Behind The Scenes Look


Behind the scenes as Sotheby’s prepares the Gunter Sachs Collection ahead of the sale on May 22nd and 23rd, 2012. Sotheby’s will be offering close to 300 works of art from the prestigious single owner collection. The sale is estimated to realise ¬£20 million.

Almost 7200 pictures were used in this timelapse. The majority were shot on a pair of Canon 5D MkII cameras specifically set up for shooting this timelapse (with a 16-35mm f2.8L II and 24-105mm f4L), one being triggered by a Pocket Wizard Multimax and the other by the highly configurable IO Shutter running on an iPad 3. A GoPro HD Hero was used for the overhead view timelapse. Reportage images were shot on a Leica M9 and M9-P (using a 50mm Noctilux ASPH, 35mm Summilux ASPH and 28mm Summicron ASPH). The images were all processed in Apple’s Aperture and the video created using Apple’s FCP X.

Huge word of thanks to everyone involved, especially the team from Sotheby’s press office, the lighting crew , technicians and contemporary art experts.

Update: Thrilled to share that the video is published on The Guardian website.

Reportage On The RNOH

The Power Of Photographs

Following the RNOH film, I decided I wanted to do a different edit to our TAPTV film. My thoughts were to combine some photographs within the edit. At first I looked through the beautifully edited by Neil Patience film and realised that there were some nice still images within the footage. With Quicktime 7, I went back to the original Canon 5D MkII footage and exported some still images, particularly from the interview sections.

These images were imported into Aperture 3 where I processed them. For the B/W conversions I exported them into Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2. Here I created four custom looks and these were applied to the images as appropriate. Using FCP X I then did an re-edit of the film, incorporating the images captures. I also used Red Giant’s Magic Bullet Looks 2 to grade the film slightly differently to our original.

Earlier this year, we decided that to coincide with the launch, it would be a great idea to shoot a proper photo reportage on the RNOH, so over a three and a half day period, using a Leica M9 and M9-P, I wandered the operating theatres, halls and wards (with the invaluable help from the fundraising and communications teams), making a set of pictures. I mainly shot the entire project using the Leica  50mm Noctilux APSH, the new 35mm Summilux ASPH and the 28mm Summicron.

These were first edited in Aperture for my agency Eyevine and once done, I set about incorporating them into my video edit. As before, Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2 was used for the B/W conversions and I set about importing them into FCP X and making the new edit of the video.

There is something much more powerful with B/W imagery and for me, this version is even more powerful. It’s a full multimedia marriage of video, audio and photography. I’d love to know which version of the film you find stronger and why.

My biggest ask though is that if you were touched by this amazing place, please help in their redevelopment and donate to the RNOH fund. Thank you.

Lastly, here is a slideshow of my favourite photographs from the project:

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The Canon C300 Review

Hands On With The Canon C300


I recently had the pleasure of shooting some video on the new Canon C300 during the C300 event at New Day Pictures. The aim being to show off the camera’s abilities to the guests by supplying footage for editor and colourist Neil Patience to showcase during the day. Our model for the day was the extremely talented and wonderful¬†Vicki Blatchley.

For this video I used the C300 PL, which as it’s name suggests, has the PL mount. During the shoot I used the RED 50mm and 85mm PL lenses. Lighting was by two LED panels with the main light coming from a Kino Flo Diva-Lite. I also had the pleasure of trying out a Miller tripod for the first time and must say, I was rather impressed. All equipment was supplied by New Day Pictures (whom I highly recommend for any video, lighting and accessory rentals).

An ungraded, straight from the C300 stills capture, using Quicktime. The colourspace on the camera was set to EOS for this clip. Image: Edmond Terakopian

Firstly, I need to clarify that the C300 was a pre-production model; having said this, it performed flawlessly. Having never seen, let alone used this camera, after a few minutes of training by Canon’s staff at the event I was ready to shoot. It’s an amazingly simple camera to get to grips with with a clear menu system and extremely clearly market keys dotted around the camera; I found it ergonomically brilliant. A very comfortable camera to hold and use. I was also surprised that it was lighter than I anticipated. For any prolonged handheld use though, I would probably suggest a shoulder rig. All the shots in their short film where done on the Miller tripod. My only disappointment was the microphone holder needed a spacer and so I couldn’t use my trusty Rode NTG3 to test out the camera’s audio abilities.

Vick Blatchley with the EF mount version of the Canon C300. This image is a screengrab from a Canon C300 video file. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

After the first shoot, I was impressed by the camera but was extremely keen to see what the footage looked like on the editing station. Once the files were transcoded from MXF files to Pro Res 422 (using the free Canon XF FCP plugin) we looked at them in FCP 7. Straight out the camera the files were amazingly lush. Full of detail, vivid with accurate colours and pin sharp. The most astonishing aspect was the dynamic range; the camera has it’s widest range at 850 ISO. Not only was this apparent in all the extreme highlight and shadow detail, but equally apparent was just how clean the files looked. This camera is the available light shooters’ dream. Along with it’s built in optical ND filters, shooting to achieve maximum dynamic range in outdoor situations is going to be a walk in the park. In use, the fold out LCD monitor was an absolute joy to use. For handheld use, the built in viewfinder makes things more comfortable, taking on the form factor of a DSLR and providing another point of contact to steady the shot.

Using the Canon C300 at the NDP open day event. Photo ©

For my edit here, I used FCP 7 and the Canon XF plugin to transcode the files and imported them into FCP X for my edit. Initial grading was done in FCP X and finished off using Magic Bullet Mojo. This workflow is a bit annoying (and is the first time I have used FCP7 since upgrading to FCP X) but I’m guessing it’s only a matter of time until there’s full compatibility).

My half day with the camera was an absolute joy. My nervousness at perhaps jumping in at the deep end having to produce footage on a brand new camera were unfounded. I took to it like it was a familiar piece of kit. Judging by how well it performed (running for around six hours solid) and how amazing the footage looks, I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending the C300. The only snag is the ¬£10,000+VAT asking price. If I find my video work increasing as it has done over the last few years, I won’t hesitate in getting one of these, but until then, alas it will remain out of reach. So far, it is the most capable video camera I have worked on, and that includes the RED One and my beloved Canon 5D MkII. In fact, why not rent one from the folks at New Day Pictures¬†and see what the fuss is about!