Tag Archives: photojournalism

World Press Photo of the Year 2016

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An image by Australian photographer Warren Richardson is the World Press Photo of the Year

© Warren Richardson - Hope for a New Life

Hope for a New Life. A man passes a baby through the fence at the Serbia/Hungary border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015. Photo: ©Warren Richardson

When I logged on to the World Press Photo website and saw the the winning image, I found myself uncontrollably saying “wow” out loud. It’s an amazingly powerful image, highlighting an extremely important issue, photographed with such skill and empathy. Many congratulations to Warren Richardson for his stunning image and for the judges in choosing it out of the submitted 82,951 photographs.

Richardson is a freelance photographer, currently based in Budapest, Hungary. He explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone”.

View the entire collection of winning images from the 59th World Press Photo Contest. They were selected from 82,951 photos made by 5,775 photographers from 128 different countries.

For any photographers wondering about the technical aspects of the winning image; the shot was made on a Canon 5D MkII using a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens at 6400ISO, f1.4 with a shutter speed of 1/5 of a second.

Here are a selection of my favourite images from the contest

(in no particular order):

All photographs are copyright. Used with the permission of World Press Photo.

London Bombings

10 Years On From The Terrorist Attacks On London

Paul Dadge leads Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) away from Edgware Road tube station after a suicide bomb attack in which she suffered burn injuries, resulting in the need for a face mask. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers - one of four coordinated attacks on London's public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in some 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Paul Dadge leads Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) away from Edgware Road tube station after a suicide bomb attack in which she suffered burn injuries, resulting in the need for a face mask. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers – one of four coordinated attacks on London’s public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

It’s with a heavy heart that I look back to the events of 10 years ago. 7/7, the day my home town was attacked by four suicide bombers who killed innocent people who were just trying to commute using the tube trains and a bus.

A commuter, still clutching his morning newspaper, leaves Edgware Road Underground Station after a suicide bomb attack. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers - one of four coordinated attacks on London's public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in some 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A commuter, still clutching his morning newspaper, leaves Edgware Road Underground Station after a suicide bomb attack. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

I thought it appropriate to republish a slightly updated version of the article I wrote for the Digital Journalist at the time of the attacks:

London’s Darkest Hour

July 7, 2005. I was looking forward to today. Yesterday had ended on a high. London had been nominated as the Olympic City for 2012. I had two excellent assignments today; the first was an 8.30am photocall at the Natural History Museum to photograph a new diamond exhibition. The second was an exclusive look at how the Police were monitoring the security for the G8 summit from their secret control centre.

There must have been around 20 photographers waiting to photograph the diamonds. We were queuing to photograph the world’s largest uncut diamond. I was waiting patiently, macro lens and lights in hand, for my turn. As I contemplated getting a coffee, my phone rang; it was the PA office, for whom I was working today. “There’s been an explosion at Aldgate East tube station….get there. They’re saying it’s a power surge”. I caught every one’s attention as I started to pack away my gear, as a few colleagues were waiting to borrow my macro lens! Slowly, the others began to get calls.

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As I rushed outside, a friend from AP asked for a lift as we were both going to Aldgate. We got in my car and started making our way as quickly as traffic allowed. The phone rang again, “There’s been a second explosion at Edgware Road tube. Go there instead as you’re closer”. My heart sank. This was no longer an accident as originally thought. How can there be two explosions on the tube in the same morning. I knew it must be terrorism. I began to think of 9/11. The first plane could have been an accident, but as the second plane hit…..

We were very lucky. The traffic was a lot better than usual and we got to Edgware Road quickly. As we got to the scene, we were greeted by a lot of silence. The emergency services were all busy. No screaming of orders, nor the sound of sirens. I must commend them on their professionalism. Unfortunately, the Police had erected their cordons, and there was no way to get close to the tube station. I did a quick walk around the roads, and decided which would be the best. Luckily I had picked the correct road. Within ten minutes, the first passengers walked out and down the road, closely followed by the walking wounded. The first sight that drew me was a lady being helped by a young man (Paul Dadge as I found out the following day). Her face was burnt and she had a white face mask on. She was barefoot, and had blood on her legs. I felt bad for her suffering. I had an instance of battling with the shock of witnessing what clearly illustrated something terrible had happened beneath us. Reminding myself of my duty as a photojournalist, my camera was raised. For the next five minutes, all I saw was through the viewfinder. Concentrating on the images which were presenting themselves.

Paul Dadge leads Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) away from Edgware Road tube station after a suicide bomb attack in which she suffered burn injuries, resulting in the need for a face mask. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers - one of four coordinated attacks on London's public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in some 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Paul Dadge leads Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) away from Edgware Road tube station after a suicide bomb attack in which she suffered burn injuries, resulting in the need for a face mask. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

It was a very intense five minutes. So many injured. The thing that struck me the most though, was I only saw one person crying. Everyone else was composed; there was no screaming, no running. Everyone, including the lady with the burnt face, and even the crying lady, were very dignified. I saw a gentleman, bandaged on his neck and head, blood on his face and shirt, still carrying his newspaper (now covered in blood) as if nothing out of the ordinary had happened. It was amazing. This was the British spirit; the stiff upper lip talked of by Sir Winston Churchill.

The wounded were taken to the Hilton Metropole Hotel. I decided to go inside and managed to stay for several minutes, taking pictures of the wounded waiting for treatment. It must have been the world’s poshest triage area. The hotel’s security soon noticed me, and I was asked to leave.

An injured Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) from the Edgware Road Station Underground suicide bomb attack get medical attention in the triage area set up at the Hilton London Metropole Hotel in Edgware Road. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers - one of four coordinated attacks on London's public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in some 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

An injured Davinia Turrell (now Davinia Douglass) from the Edgware Road Station Underground suicide bomb attack get medical attention in the triage area set up at the Hilton London Metropole Hotel in Edgware Road. London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

After another ten minutes or so, it was obvious all the pictures had been taken and I made my way to the nearest Starbucks to wire on their WiFi. Although all the mobile networks (cellphones) were down, WiFi was still working…thankfully. After wiring I returned to the scene. As nothing was going on, I contacted the office. They asked me to check out Kings Cross station. By now, we knew that there were at least four explosions; three on the tube, and one on a bus.

Walking wounded leave Edgware Road Underground Station after a suicide bomb attack. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers - one of four coordinated attacks on London's public transport system during the morning rush hour. The bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on London Underground trains, and the fourth bomb occurred on a bus less than an hour later. The explosions resulted in some 56 deaths (including those of the four bombers) and 700 injuries. Surveillance video footage showed that the four men had been working together. Intelligence services have claimed links between the bombers and al-Qaeda. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Walking wounded leave Edgware Road Underground Station after a suicide bomb attack. The bomber blew himself up on a train at the station, killing seven passengers. Edgware Road underground station, London, United Kingdom. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

As I made my way, a friend contacted me saying that he had heard of someone who had been evacuated from Leicester Square tube, following another explosion. This was minutes ago. I called the office to let them know, and I made my way. The streets were clear. No cars, no buses, no people. Just silent emptiness.

I got there to find that there was no explosion; just that the station, along with all others in London were closed. I found out later that it was a controlled explosion by the Army on a suspect package.

I got to Kings Cross. Police cordons were well and truly up. There was no access. The explosions were below ground and there was nothing to photograph. Knowing how long this day was going to be, I grabbed a sandwich and a coffee.

I was then sent to Tavistock Square, where the bus had been bombed. I had high hopes of getting an image as this was in plain sight. As I got there and saw the hoards of frustrated media, I knew this wasn’t to be easy. Again, the Police with their cordon tape had been out and had covered everything within sight with blue and white tape. I attempted to get into a high rise hotel, only to be greeted rather rudely by two security men. I was rather chuffed as another four joined them. Obviously they thought two goons weren’t enough!

After another hour or so, I had to admit defeat; there was no way I could find an angle. I called the office and was told not to worry, as one of our photographers had managed to get a good shot. “Can you get to Downing Street for Blair in 20 minutes?”. I said that it was impossible! I was sent anyway!

It was for a picture of the PM arriving at number 10. I had missed it. I got another call, “Can you go to Buckingham Palace, the flag’s at half mast”. Back in the car, and off I went. This was the last image I took today. A very sad and symbolic way to end London’s darkest day. My city had been targeted by terrorists.

Terrorist suicide bombing of London.  The Union Flag flies at half mast at Buckingham Palace follwing the request of the Queen in memory of the victims who lost their lives in the morning's terrorist attacks. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Terrorist suicide bombing of London. The Union Flag flies at half mast at Buckingham Palace follwing the request by the Queen in memory of the victims who lost their lives in the morning’s terrorist attacks. July 07, 2005. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

*I have since left PA. For syndication of this work please contact Eyevine or Polaris Images.

The Power Of A Photograph

Our Own Personal Histories

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

The power of the photograph never ceases to amaze me. A good friend, the talented Hakob Berberyan (also known as Hakber), a photojournalist and sports photographer based in Armenia, has over the last two days found some pictures he took of me in Karabakh, back in 1994.

Receiving these images out of the blue, has taken me on a journey through time. A reflection on the sadness of war, meeting the most amazing people manning the trenches in Martakert, the amazing spirit of ordinary people in villages thrown into a conflict zone, the value of friendship and camaraderie. The humbling feeling of a people so thankful that someone had come to photograph and thus document what they were going through.

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

A cocktail of feelings and thoughts, and a montage of remembered images, some photographed and some seen, a remembrance of youth and wonder, all brought about by seeing a photograph. Amazing.

The AMAHORO Generation

the youth of Rwanda talk peace

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates.  Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates. Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Savagery took over the mind, they went out hunting as kindred spirits, they became a ferocious barbaric species. They were the Interahamwe, the infamous killers of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. They were also the youth of the nation.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child's white sock - the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda,  June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child’s white sock – the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda, June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Two decades on victim and perpetrator are still coping with the aftermath of the 100 days the world chose to ignore.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Born during the genocide era, Rwandan’s youth speak of their aspirations, their hope for peace in the aftermath of a brutal war that fractured their nation. They are the generation that wants to be acknowledged as Rwandese, united in purpose, eliminating historical tribal labels of Hutu and Tutsi. They want their legacy to be known as the Amahoro generation, the peace brokers; where the youth of their parent’s generation were the brutal warriors.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

Amahoro, means peace; it is the youth’s anchor to pursue their destiny.

To mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide and to coincide with the UN International Day of Peace on 21 September, International Alert present The Amahoro Generation: The youth of Rwanda talk peace.

The exhibition, by award-winning photojournalist Carol Allen-Storey, documents the stories of young people born amid the horrors of the Rwandan genocide, and their hopes for ‘amahoro’ – peace. It is an ideal rooted in the wisdom that without peace, there is no future. “Peace unifies,” says Angelique, aged 21 from Gatumba. “Without peace, people remain divided.”

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

“I was struck by the collective view of these young people that they must ensure there is never another genocide – and to do so, learn to forgive and fuel their energy into building a united and prosperous country,” says photographer Carol Allen-Storey.

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert  and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The outdoor exhibition, “The Amahoro Generation”, is on display from the 18th of September to the 2nd of October 2014 (now extended to the 2nd of November 2014; see addendum below) on the South Bank in London at The Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walkway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London SE1 9PP and is free to attend.

Addendum: Some fantastic news; the Amahoro exhibition has been extended for anther 4 weeks. The South Bank have said that responses have been phenomanal and they requested an extended run. The exhibition has been moved in the court yard between OXO Tower and the Barge House and is on until the 2nd of November 2014.

Earlier this year, Carol spent a month in Rwanda, travelling across the country with her Canon 5D MkII cameras documenting the commemoration and interviewing the youth. The exhibition was printed by built by Standard8, designed by Stuart Smith and post produced by Edmond Terakopian.

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A Tribute To Those Who Gave Their All

The Last Shutter

Lost Over Laos

The Power Of Photography

The Napalm Girl By Nick Ut

In my opinion, AP photographer Nick Ut‘s Pulitzer Prize winning photograph from the Vietnam War, commonly known as the “Napalm Girl” is the most iconic and most powerful photograph ever taken.

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim's cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

In this June 8, 1972 file photo, crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. From left, the children are Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim’s cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. AP Photo/Nick Ut

Here’s a superb ABC7 Special about the image, the stories and people involved. It’s well worth watching. Powerful, moving, interesting.


Fascinatingly, this TV documentary also clearly shows the power of photography compared to TV footage. Nick Ut’s photograph has such power and depth, compared to the TV footage which whilst strong, has no where near the strength of the still image. Anyone who doesn’t understand the power of a photograph needs to be shown this documentary.

Highly Commended: Multimedia Section

The Press Photographers’ Year 2013

The results of The Press Photographer’s Year 2013 were announced on 1st July, showcasing the very best press photography from 2011 & 2012 taken for and used by the UK news media.

The Press Photographers' Year (PPY) website, Highly Commended, Multimedia section.

The Press Photographers’ Year (PPY) website, Highly Commended, Multimedia section.

Absolutely delighted and honoured to have had my work chosen by the judges of PPY 2013 (Press Photographers’ Year). I was fortunate to receive “Highly Commended” in the Multimedia section, for a project I shot on the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital (RNOH) which was produced and edited by the very talented Neil Patience at TAP TV.

The video was shot over several months using Canon 5D MkII cameras and lenses, and edited by Neil Patience using FCP 7. For the multimedia piece, further photographs were taken using Leica M9 cameras and lenses, and the piece was re-edited by me using FCP X. All audio was recorded using Rode microphones; the VideoMic, VideoMic Pro and NTG-3. The film had it’s premiere screening at St James’s Palace.

“Now in its seventh year, the competition’s aim is to demonstrate that even in an age of rolling television news, internet and satellite communication, the traditional still image burns the keenest, fastest impression on the public conscience and is the most effective way to show the world the world as it really is.”

I’m also delighted that one of my photographs (“Love Your Job”) was also selected for the PPY exhibition at the National Theatre in London. It will be featured in “Features” section, joining the 150 images chosen from the just over 12,500 submitted by 390 photographers, from over 20 countries. All the winning images can be viewed on this slide show and details of the winners are also on this list. A full Press Release is also available.

The Press Photographers' Year (PPY) website, "Features" section.

The Press Photographers’ Year (PPY) website, “Features” section.

Huge congratulations to all the winners; this year’s winning imagery is spectacular and the exhibition is definitely one not to miss; National Theatre, South Bank, London, from July 6th to August 31st, 2013.