Tag Archives: fundraising

Two Days To Go! MSF Fundraiser

Our fundraising print auction, almost eight months in the making, ends this Sunday, November 15th at 5pm. The auction is open now for bids, so please swing by, look at the amazing selection of prints, make an investment and literally, help to save lives.

What challenging times we’re living in. Most of the world is sadly gripped by a second wave of this awful pandemic. At least the environment is definitely benefitting from these lockdowns as we all become Zoom experts though.

Sadly the timing of our MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders) fundraising auction couldn’t be more appropriate. Every penny we raise will go directly to the organisation and help their stellar work across 70 countries, battling this pandemic.

From purely an investment point of view, not surprisingly, spending has been lower for so many people during the past nine months and I think that’s probably going to be reflected in the bidding in our auction, which could end with some bargains to be had. Of course every penny raised will still help MSF and benefit all those whose aid they come to.

Some thoughts and advice from TV auctioneer extraordinaire James Lewis on collecting photography.

James has kindly been a big supporter of this auction and donated his time. Bamford Auctions and The Saleroom have also waived their fees too, so all of this project is about MSF. So do swing by, have a look, collect some great photography and help make an immediate and crucial difference: https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/timed/bamfords/catalogue-id-bamfor10698

Eyewitness MSF Charity Photographic Print Auction

MSF’s Coronavirus Crisis Appeal

After seven months of work, I’m thrilled, excited, nervous and overjoyed to share a project that our team at Eyewitness have been working on.

It’s an online print auction with the wonderful folks at Bamfords and the amazing James Lewis, of 66 photographic prints by 42 photographers worldwide, to raise funds for Médecins Sans Frontières’s COVID 19 fund.

People out for a Sunday stroll sit and enjoy the view of the bay with its yachts and the town perched on the hillsides. Whitby, Yorkshire, UK. 1974. Photo: Ian Berry / Magnum Photos

The auction is on now and will be ending on Sunday 15th November 2020 at 05:00PM (GMT). You can see the auction lots here: https://www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk/sales/derby/c14nov20/

Whilst in the COVID 19 pandemic lockdown, a concerned group of 17 photographers, members of the Eyewitness Collective, dispersed across several continents, came up with an idea: to collect a series of prints by members and by selected invited photographers, in order to raise funds for the battle against this awful pandemic. We have been overjoyed by the feedback and thrilled that so many world-class photographers, true masters of their craft, have donated their beautiful prints. 

9th Division Trooper, ‘Y’ Bridge, Mini Tet, Saigon, Vietnam, 1968. Photo: Tim Page

As numbers of infections and deaths due to COVID 19 are sadly on the rise again and lockdowns are imminent, it’s very timely to make this project a reality, so we ask our friends and colleagues in the media to help this cause. 

As an international group, we couldn’t have chosen a more important, dynamic and crucial group of people as the teams at MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders). The organisation is working across the world, to counter COVID 19. With nearly 50 years of experience fighting epidemics, protecting the most vulnerable and saving countless lives, we are humbled to do our part in helping MSF.  We ask you to join us in turning our hopes into reality and make a difference in the lives of so many.

“MSF would like to say a huge thank you to the Eyewitness Collective for choosing to support our COVID-19 response. MSF is currently racing to respond to the pandemic in over 70 countries, and funds raised by the Eyewitness Collective will undoubtedly help us to achieve our vital priorities. These include supporting health systems and authorities, protecting vulnerable populations through vital medical services, improving infection prevention and control measures, and even opening new projects” – Meera Patel, Community and Corporate Giving Coordinator, MSF UK.

I’m humbled to have my two donated prints in the company of an image by Magnum Photos’ legendary photographer Ian Berry from his iconic series The English, an image by the renowned Vietnam War photographer Tim Page, an image by the celebrated photojournalist Tom Stoddart from The Sudan, the fall of the Berlin Wall by the prominent photojournalist Paul Lowe, timeless fine art prints by the creative Yoshie Nishikawa, as well as several celebrity portraits by the likes of Mark Harrison, Jason Bell, Nicky Johnston and Clive Arrowsmith, to name just a few. 

A rare moment of joy between siblings at Ajiep, in Bahr El Ghazal Province , south Sudan during the devastating famine of 1998. Photo: Tom Stoddart

The vast majority of the participating photographers are multi award-winning creatives, whose recognisable works grace the walls of galleries and private collections, the pages of magazines and books, the world over. The collection of prints cover fine art, photojournalism, music, street photography, portraiture, abstracts, landscape and daily life. We also have a couple of timely images made during this pandemic.

“The art of photography has been the choice for the wise investor for the past decade. It is a great honour to team up with some of the world’s greatest photographers to help the world face its biggest challenge in over a century” – James Lewis, CEO of Bamfords, is a regular face and voice on TV and radio.

Auctioneer James Lewis, CEO of Bamfords, is a regular face and voice on television and radio; he is without doubt one of the most recognised faces in the international antiques world. Photo: Stuart Wood

We’re thrilled to embark on this project and collaborate with the well-loved TV auctioneer extraordinaire, the wonderful James Lewis, who will be spearheading this online auction. He has generously donated his time and expertise, so that all of the money raised from this print auction can be donated to the MSF COVID 19 appeal, funding their emergency teams of experts as they help save lives. We’re most thankful that, as well as working tirelessly for many weeks preparing the sale, the wonderful team at the auction house Bamfords, have waived all auction fees, as have the kind folks at The Saleroom, which will provide the online platform for this auction, for free. This collaboration will ensure that the funds raised will go to MSF.

“GraphiStudio is thrilled to be doing its part in the photographic community and helping the Eyewitness Collective with their charity fundraising print auction to help raise funds for MSF’s COVID 19 fund” – Dario Righetto, GraphiStudio Global Marketing Director 

We’re also most thankful to our friends at the world renowned GraphiStudio who will be making several of the museum quality prints of these wonderful images and are supporting our initiative by waiving all of their fees too. 

A couple laugh together on the West side of the Berlin Wall as the first people began crossing into the other half of the city. Berlin, Germany. 1989. Photo: Paul Lowe

Full List of Photographers Who Have Donated Their Work

Amelia Troubridge (UK), Brian Harris (UK), Clive Arrowsmith (UK), Crispin Rodwell (Rep of Ireland), Dave Sinclair (UK), David A Williams (Canada), Edmond Terakopian (UK), Fabrizia Costa (UK), Giles Duley (UK), Greg Finck (France), Ian Berry (UK), Ian Gavan (UK), Jason Bell (UK), Jill Furmanovsky (UK), Johnson Wee (Malaysia), John Downing (UK), Marcus Bell (Australia), Mark Harrison (UK), Mark Waugh (UK), Markus Andersen (Australia), Michael Mac Sweeney (Rep of Ireland), Nick Turpin (UK), Nicky Johnston (UK), Nik Pekridis (Greece), Paul Lowe (UK), Paul Sanders (UK), Peter Adams (Australia), Peter Neill (UK), Richard Bradbury (UK), Rob Heyman (Australia), Rob Taggart (UK), Rocco Ancora (Australia), Ross Grieve (UK), Salvatore Dimino (Italy), Shane Balkowitsch (USA), Steve Scalone (Australia), Steven Neeson (UK), Stuart Wood (UK), Terry Harris (UK), Tim Page (Australia), Tom Stoddart (UK) and Yoshie Nishikawa (Italy).

My Metaphysical 3 I photographed these invisible feelings of mine. The melancholy of existence and the absence of time. Photo: Yoshie Nishikawa

As numbers of infections and deaths due to COVID 19 are sadly on the rise again and more lockdowns are imminent, it’s very timely to make this project a reality, so we ask our friends and colleagues and all lovers of photography to help us publicise this project far and wide. The more we raise, the more people will survive this horrid pandemic, which affects us all, regardless of geography. 

Deserted London town following the COVID 19 pandemic and the first month of the coronavirus lockdown. The deserted courtyard in the famous Covent Garden Apple Market. London, UK. April 23, 2020. Photo: Edmond Terakopian
A heavy downpour of rain soaks pedestrians as they pass an illuminated advertising sign saying “Love Your Job”. Hammersmith, London. January 14, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

So please visit the auction, register and place a bid or two on some wonderful photography: https://www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk/sales/derby/c14nov20/

A small selection of the 66 images can be viewed in the gallery below.

Reportage On The RNOH

The Power Of Photographs

Following the RNOH film, I decided I wanted to do a different edit to our TAPTV film. My thoughts were to combine some photographs within the edit. At first I looked through the beautifully edited by Neil Patience film and realised that there were some nice still images within the footage. With Quicktime 7, I went back to the original Canon 5D MkII footage and exported some still images, particularly from the interview sections.

These images were imported into Aperture 3 where I processed them. For the B/W conversions I exported them into Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2. Here I created four custom looks and these were applied to the images as appropriate. Using FCP X I then did an re-edit of the film, incorporating the images captures. I also used Red Giant’s Magic Bullet Looks 2 to grade the film slightly differently to our original.

Earlier this year, we decided that to coincide with the launch, it would be a great idea to shoot a proper photo reportage on the RNOH, so over a three and a half day period, using a Leica M9 and M9-P, I wandered the operating theatres, halls and wards (with the invaluable help from the fundraising and communications teams), making a set of pictures. I mainly shot the entire project using the Leica  50mm Noctilux APSH, the new 35mm Summilux ASPH and the 28mm Summicron.

These were first edited in Aperture for my agency Eyevine and once done, I set about incorporating them into my video edit. As before, Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2 was used for the B/W conversions and I set about importing them into FCP X and making the new edit of the video.

There is something much more powerful with B/W imagery and for me, this version is even more powerful. It’s a full multimedia marriage of video, audio and photography. I’d love to know which version of the film you find stronger and why.

My biggest ask though is that if you were touched by this amazing place, please help in their redevelopment and donate to the RNOH fund. Thank you.

Lastly, here is a slideshow of my favourite photographs from the project:

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Making The RNOH Appeal Film

Neil Patience, Editor & Producer on the film, shares his thoughts about the project and also talks of his philosophy behind the editing as well as his workflow.

My own journey with the RNOH began in June 2004 when I was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, a rare bone cancer. If it was not for Professor Tim Briggs and his staff I would not be here today. I literally owe them my life.

During one of my regular check ups in early 2011, Professor Briggs asked me if I would be willing to make an appeal film for the then upcoming RNOH redevelopment appeal. Of course I agreed without hesitation.

Behind the scenes photograph of the filming of the appeal film. Photographer Edmond Terakopian, Rosie Stolarski (head of fundraising), Editor Neil Patience and ex-patient Phil Packer. RNOH, Stanmore. Photo: Nicola Taylor

I had been an admirer of Edmond Terakopian’s work for some time and we had already briefly worked on a couple of minor projects and camera tests with the Red One together.

I knew his skill with a 5DMKII and journalistic instincts would be perfect for a project.

From our first meeting with the RNOH it was clear that the brief was a little complex as the film was to serve several purposes.

It needed to illustrate the ground breaking world class work that is carried out at RNOH but at the same time reflect the run down infrastructure of the hospital (the reason behind the fundraising appeal).

Patients and their families invariably spoke very highly of the staff at all levels and unsurprisingly had nothing but praise for the often life changing or indeed life saving treatment. Their feelings about the surroundings where that treatment was delivered was another story. So it was somewhat of a paradox that had to be addressed in making the film.

Edmond and I along with Professor Briggs and Rosie Stolarski, head of the hospital charity, decided to make the film in a documentary style to be able to intertwine patients stories, the work the hospital does. the new building projects and the reasons behind the appeal.

With the help of the hospital we selected seven patients who’s conditions, ages and treatments reflected the range of RNOH’s work. They, like me, all agreed to take part without any persuasion.

Tim Briggs was going to be the backbone of the film, his interview was key to providing the  information about the hospital, the appeal, and the aims of the redevelopment.

The patients would tell their own stories, and the GV’s around the hospital grounds and wards spoke for themselves.

So essentially we went into the edit with broadly 3 elements, Tim’s Interview, the patient interviews and the shots of the hospital both interiors and exterior.

We have both Avid and FCP editing options but I decided to edit the film using Final Cut Pro as I wanted the option to use Apple Color to grade and that gives me the easiest workflow.

I used the basic FCP Log and Transfer tool to transcode all the rushes to ProRes HQ (and made a back-up of all the media.)

Editing the fund raising video for RNOH at New Day Pictures' Final Cut Pro editing suite in Surrey. Assistant Nicola Taylor and video editor Neil Patience at work, discussing the interview transcripts. November 08, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Initially I had to sync up all the audio recorded on the Zoom H4n with the 2 Canon 5D MKII cameras. I was going to use PluralEyes for this but quickly realised that the audio recordings for each interview were continuous and the cameras only stopped recording two or three times during each interview (due to limitations set in video length on DSLRs).

So it was very easy and quick to lay the pictures against the Zoom sound manually, matching the waveforms, and creating a multicam sequence for each interview.

Once all were assembled we had them transcribed (by UK Transcription in Brighton) which made editing them much easier.

First I made several long assembles of all the sync interviews that we wanted to include from Tim Briggs and each patient, editing and re-editing to get the most powerful comments as they each told their stories and spoke of their experiences at RNOH. Having two cameras meant that it was much easier to cut down without worrying about finding cutaways or having to re-order shots to get cuts. It gave me a lot of flexibility.

Once I had a long assembly I was happy with Edmond and photographer Nicola Taylor, who had been our assistant though-out, to join me in the edit suite.

We spent 2 more days cutting and recutting, slowly getting the duration down, selecting cutaways and GV’s. We revisited the transcriptions many times adding and replacing shots, interview segments and selecting music until we had our film.

I had intended to grade the whole film using Color but the rushes looked fabulous and needed less work than I had imagined at the outset. Instead I decided to use a combination of Color on some shots that required several secondary corrections and mask layers to get sky and foreground nicely graded and Gen Arts Sapphire plug-ins on other shots, namely the interviews and to provide some subtle vignettes here and there.

Sapphire Film Effect provided a lovely gamma curve while adding a very subtle softness to the shots. It also allows for some colour balancing and the trusty FCP 3 way colour corrector also played a part here and there.

The audio mix was quite straight forward as it was essentially sync sound, atmos and music. I mixed the audio directly in FCP. The suite at New Day Pictures has broadcast monitoring for both audio and video (Leader rasterizer and PPM’s) so everything was completed to UK HD broadcast spec.

We made Bluray DVD’s using Adobe Encore and standard def DVD’s using DVD Studio Pro. Transcodes were completed using a combination of Compressor, MPEG Streamclip and Telestream Episode.

By Neil Patience

Stay tuned as we launch the film on the TAPTV website and more behind the scenes posts, right here.