Tag Archives: photography

World Press Photo of the Year 2016

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An image by Australian photographer Warren Richardson is the World Press Photo of the Year

© Warren Richardson - Hope for a New Life

Hope for a New Life. A man passes a baby through the fence at the Serbia/Hungary border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015. Photo: ©Warren Richardson

When I logged on to the World Press Photo website and saw the the winning image, I found myself uncontrollably saying “wow” out loud. It’s an amazingly powerful image, highlighting an extremely important issue, photographed with such skill and empathy. Many congratulations to Warren Richardson for his stunning image and for the judges in choosing it out of the submitted 82,951 photographs.

Richardson is a freelance photographer, currently based in Budapest, Hungary. He explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone”.

View the entire collection of winning images from the 59th World Press Photo Contest. They were selected from 82,951 photos made by 5,775 photographers from 128 different countries.

For any photographers wondering about the technical aspects of the winning image; the shot was made on a Canon 5D MkII using a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens at 6400ISO, f1.4 with a shutter speed of 1/5 of a second.

Here are a selection of my favourite images from the contest

(in no particular order):

All photographs are copyright. Used with the permission of World Press Photo.

Who Owns A Photo?

The Copyright Of A Photograph

Copyright Symbol Textured

The folks at Clifton Cameras have put together a very neat graphic explaining much about ownership of the image.

The only thing I would add is that adding a watermark (use Marksta on an iPhone or software such as Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop on your Mac or PC) is essential when you post images online on services like FaceBook and Instagram which as their T&Cs state, have full rights to use the posted images as they see fit. You need to protect not only your copyright but also the subjects in your images from having their likeness used to promote services they wouldn’t be happy with. Watermarking also protects you against companies which may steal your image for commercial gain, try and Photoshop out your watermark and then plead ignorance. Image forensics can easily show tampering and with this you prove intent, followed by a nice payout.

When hosting your own website of photography, it’s wise not to post images full size; these are easily stolen and can be used in a variety of ways as the size allows printing and so on. Using the services of Pixelrights as your host means that you benefit from all the various anti-theft features they have as well as future plans for their new partnership with ImageRights. Highly recommended.

Shaun Curry, Co-founder & CEO of Pixelrights adds; “ImageRights International is honored to announce a new and exciting partnership with Pixelrights. This groundbreaking partnership will provide post infringement, image tracking & USCO registration included in the price of your Pixelrights subscription.
Pixelrights are the only portfolio service focused on championing copyright awareness by use of their patent pending ‘Smart Frame’ image technology
This new image format provides their members with substantial customisable technical protection, blocking illicit web-bots, stopping unwanted hot linking, disabling right click , blocking some screen grab attempts, save-as, and eliminating the image from the source file and web page.
With ImageRights technology included if anyone removes any technical protection measures from your Pixelrights site and publishes it on the web, ImageRights will track your image down, and provide a global network of IP
lawyers to take action on your behalf. Never before has a portfolio website been so safe yet so easy to use!”.

Remember, copyright is your right. You are the author and the image is yours. When getting commissioned to take pictures, you aren’t being paid for the copyright, but are being commissioned to make the photograph and granting the client a right to use the image; you’re licensing them image usage. Without your copyright you can’t even legally post your picture on your website, enter it in a competition or have a print in your portfolio. You will lose all sales and recognition as the image becomes of historical value in the future. Don’t be bullied; don’t let multi-million pound companies take advantage of your work and force you into signing away your rights.

Click to enlarge the graphic:

Who Owns A Photo

Opening Night Of Opera By The River Exhibition

Private View & Launch Party

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London Photo: Nigel Howard / www.nigelhowardmedia.com

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London
Photo: Nigel Howard / http://www.nigelhowardmedia.com

September 30th saw the opening and private view of my solo exhibition, Opera By The River. Thrilled that so many friends and colleagues could join, some making considerable journeys to get there. An equally great joy was to be reunited again with the amazingly talented musicians from the Royal College of Music. A true delight to meet up with the amazing singers and instrumentalists who were part of Albert Herring, the opera.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The exhibition, kindly supported by Olympus, will continue until October the 11th on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Christopher Middleton

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London Photo: Nigel Howard / www.nigelhowardmedia.com

Edmond Terakopian at the opening of his new exhibition Opera by The River, Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London
Photo: Nigel Howard / http://www.nigelhowardmedia.com

The second part of the evening took place at the launch party (opening night only) at The Deck in the National Theatre.

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. A poster shows the way for the evening’s party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Some more imagery was on display from the project. The opening and private view of

Some more imagery was on display from the project. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

As is customary on such occasions, I had a short speech to give and thought to share it here with a wider audience:

Speeches. The opening and private view of

Speeches. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Speeches. The opening and private view of

Speeches. The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

There are some people in this room who I have known for over 25 years and some in this room who I have known for nine months (no, I’m not pregnant, this is all me!). Regardless, you’ve all been part of my life in photography and it’s such a joy to share this reportage with you. As Albert Herring went on his journey in the opera, I too had the pleasure of going on a journey with this most amazing group of supremely talented singers and instrumentalists from the Royal College of Music. 31,794 pictures shot over seven months meant I could really share with the wider world the passion and hard work that goes into putting on such a wonderful opera and I thank every single person involved for letting me delve so deeply with my cameras.

This reportage was a personal project. It came from the wish of wanting to shoot a photo essay and as luck would have it, I met Christopher Middleton on one of my workshops. When I found out he was Assistant Head of Opera at the Royal College of Music, this got me thinking. Speaking over several months when I found out about Benjamin Britten’s Albert Herring being the next production, with Britten having been a former pupil and the college’s theater being called the Britten Theatre, everything just seemed to come together.

I must say thanks to Michael Rosewell and Nick Sears from the Opera School who along with Christopher saw my vision for this project and welcomed me in with open arms. My thanks naturally extend to the Directorate for letting me have the access I needed to shoot such an intimate and in depth essay.

My thanks to the wonderful string quartet from the Royal College of Music for their beautiful music; you’ve made my heart sing.

My gratitude also goes to the super talented Stuart Smith for designing such a wonderful exhibition. It’s such a joy to work with someone not only so pleasant, but also with so much passion and understanding of photography. Stuart also kindly designed an exhibition book to go along with this project. Please make sure you pick up one of the free book leaflets and write in for your copy. It really looks amazing and I must admit to being teary eyed when I first saw the final design.

I’d also like to congratulate the wonderful team at Standard8 led by Tom Snell for their beautiful printing and exhibition construction. Over 350,000 people will see this exhibition and I’m proud for my images to be displayed in such a wonderful installation.

It’s one thing to have an idea and another thing to shoot it. Making it available for all to see is the next big hurdle. After all, pictures that remain in boxes or tucked away in virtual folders on hard drives don’t ever live up to their potential to move people. My immense gratitude goes to Olympus, not only for making the wonderful cameras I used to shoot Opera By The River, but for seeing and believing in my idea. I have to single out Mark Thackara from Olympus for his support. If it wasn’t for Olympus and the countless people there who have made this exhibition and book a reality, we wouldn’t all be together now. Thank you all so much.

Finally, thank you all; friends, colleagues and guests for coming this evening. Hope you’ve enjoyed the show and will help spread the word so others will get a chance to see the exhibition before it closes on October the 11th.

You’ve seen what they look like but the real treat to hear what they sound like. I’m thrilled to say that we are all about to be treated to a little bit of Britten’s Albert Herring by the wonderful people at the Royal College of Music.

A string quartet from the Royal College of Music performs at the opening and private view of

A string quartet from the Royal College of Music performs at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Sophie Ward / http://www.sophiephotos.com

The opening and private view of

The opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Christopher Middleton

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank and opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of

Singers from the Royal College of Music performing at the opening and private view of “Opera By The River”. Photographic exhibition by Edmond Terakopian about the opera Albert Herring at the Royal College of Music. Outdoor exhibition at Riverside Walkway, South Bank and opening party at The Deck, National Theatre, London. September 30, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant / http://www.buchangrant.com

Edmond Terakopian's solo exhibition, Opera By The River on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 29, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Edmond Terakopian’s solo exhibition, Opera By The River on Riverside Walkway, South Bank, London. September 29, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Further reading on Opera By The River:

BBC – Behind the scenes at the Royal College of Music

AP Magazine – Opera by the River photo exhibition

I hope that you can pop by and enjoy the exhibition before it finishes and also share this post widely so more will get a chance to visit the installation.

Olympus_Opera-River_Poster-FLAT

Opera By The River

A photo reportage on Benjamin Britten’s Albert Herring At the Royal College of Music

Thrilled to announce my forthcoming solo exhibition which will be on from September 30th to October 11th, 2015. It’s an outdoor exhibition on London’s South Bank, very close to the National Theatre (it’s actually just behind the IBM building) on the Riverside Walkway. There’s no entrance fee and is free for all. Do kindly spread the word!

Olympus_Opera-River_Poster-FLAT

This personal project is the culmination of seven months of photography with the Opera School at the Royal College of Music in London. With the kind support of Olympus I’m overjoyed to be able to share this work with you as an exhibition.

The exhibition itself is designed by the fabulous Stuart Smith.

It’s been a try joy to spend this time with the amazingly talented students at the RCM and the superb staff who have been more than helpful in making the reportage a reality.

You can follow more on the project on my Twitter and Instagram (@terakopian); just look for #operabytheriver

Further Reading:

Opening Night & Private View

BBC coverage of Opera By The River

Opening Night

Press Release

Embargo: For immediate release
Photo reportage by Edmond Terakopian:
The Royal College of Music photo essay project, supported by Olympus.

Opera by the River is an outdoor photographic installation, exhibiting the work of Edmond Terakopian. Terakopian spent over 7 months working with and photographing the Royal College of Music (RCM), documenting the entire process of staging an opera from the initial auditions through to the final stage take down.

From January 2015 Terakopian worked closely with the RCM and they gave him unique access to their preparations for the production of the opera ‘Albert Herring’. The photo essay captured intimate and revealing images of the opera singers, members of the orchestra and production team as they developed and finally staged the historic opera by Benjamin Britten, a former pupil of the RCM himself.

The photo essay has been edited to 62 images, giving a glimpse into the one of the world’s great conservatoires, The Royal College of Music. The photographs will be displayed at an outdoor exhibition entitled ‘Opera by the River’, on the SouthBank London.

The exhibition is free for the public to view, 24 hours a day.

The exhibition is being staged at RiverSide West on the SouthBank. Overlooking the River Thames it is a 4 minute stroll from the National Theatre and is situated behind the IBM building. It will open from Wednesday 30th September to Sunday 11th October.

The Terakopian Royal College of Music photo essay project was supported by Olympus, and shot primarily on an OM-D E-M5 Mark ll, the remainder on an OM-D E-M1.

Selected for the 32nd AOP Photography Awards

Association of Photographers Chooses Two Images For Awards’ Finals

Thrilled to share some good news! The judges of the AOP Photography Awards have chosen two of my images to go through to the finals of the awards.

The first image was shot on my Olympus PEN E-P5 and Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 PRO.

The thoughful superhero. July 19, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The thoughful superhero. July 19, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The second image was shot on my Olympus OM-D E-M1 and Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 PRO.

A murmuration of starlings at dusk, just after the sunset at the beach in Blackpool, Lancashire, United Kingdom. March 10, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A murmuration of starlings at dusk, just after the sunset at the beach in Blackpool, Lancashire, United Kingdom. March 10, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

My thanks to the judges and staff at the AOP. Fingers crossed for the final judging!

Both images were processed in Adobe’s Lightroom and finished in Alienskin’s Exposure 7 plugin.

Tips On How Not To Annoy Professional Photographers

Things To Avoid

L-R: Edmond Terakopian and Ian Berry having a chat about all things photographic London.  January 22, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant

L-R: Edmond Terakopian and Ian Berry having a chat about all things photographic. London. January 22, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant

1- Do not say “Great capture”. So annoying. Calling it a good photograph, shot or picture is all that’s needed.

2- Do not say “wow, I bet you get really nice pictures with that camera”. The camera doesn’t make the photographs; the photographer does. It’s just like you wouldn’t compliment a writer on their choice of word processor or a chef on their choice of pan.

3- Do not say things like “nice bokeh”! It’s not a compliment to make a comment on the out of focus areas on a picture; probably better to concentrate on the actual subject in the picture. If you really like how the lens renders out of focus detail (bokeh) write to the manufacturer and lens designer. They designed it and so, deserve your praise.

4- “I could’ve done that if I was there”. Well, being there at the right time is half the skill; then it’s making it happen in camera. Trust me, it’s not that easy when everything’s going down.

…perhaps most importantly:

5- Respect your copyright and don’t give away your pictures for free (or for ridiculously low pay. Remember, if it’s worth publishing, it’s worth paying for). You’re ruining an entire industry when you do this. Imagine if in your line of work a hobbyist turned up and started working for free. You would soon not have a job.

Feel free to add to this list in the comments below and please do share this post around 🙂 Thanks.

Edmond Terakopian at the new Wembley Stadium, covering the first football game after it's opening. Photo: Stuart Emmerson

Edmond Terakopian at the new Wembley Stadium, covering the first football game after its opening. Photo: Stuart Emmerson

The Power Of A Photograph

Our Own Personal Histories

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

The power of the photograph never ceases to amaze me. A good friend, the talented Hakob Berberyan (also known as Hakber), a photojournalist and sports photographer based in Armenia, has over the last two days found some pictures he took of me in Karabakh, back in 1994.

Receiving these images out of the blue, has taken me on a journey through time. A reflection on the sadness of war, meeting the most amazing people manning the trenches in Martakert, the amazing spirit of ordinary people in villages thrown into a conflict zone, the value of friendship and camaraderie. The humbling feeling of a people so thankful that someone had come to photograph and thus document what they were going through.

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

A cocktail of feelings and thoughts, and a montage of remembered images, some photographed and some seen, a remembrance of youth and wonder, all brought about by seeing a photograph. Amazing.