Tag Archives: genocide

15th Annual Black and White Spider Awards Successes

An Honourable Mention & Seven Nominations

Happy to share some pleasant news from the 15th B&W Spider Awards. The judges have kindly given a Fashion Category Honourable Mention to my backstage photograph, taken at Joshua Kane‘s fantastically creative Mythical Creatures fashion show.

Honourable Mention in Fashion. Model Seraphina Westcott gets makeup applied for her role as “The Pegasus”. Behind the scenes at Mythical Creatures, a fashion show by British designer Joshua Kane. Wardrobe, hair and makeup. The Royal Exchange, London, UK. November 08, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1 and a Lumix S Pro 50mm f1.4 lens.

From the 6,378 entries, from 69 countries, these seven images were also nominated in their categories too.

Nominee in People. Italian Alpine (Mountain Troop) soldiers at the top of Kronplatz mountain. Plan de Corones, South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites, Italy. July 20, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1R and Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens.
Nominee in Photojournalism. Wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial khachkar (a carved Armenian Stone Cross memorial sculpture) took place after a remembrance service and prayer of intercession, to commemorate the 105th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide of April 24th, 1915, when 1.5 Million Armenians were massacred by the Ottoman Empire. A member of the clergy swings a censer (a type of thurible) of incense. The usual wreath laying ceremony at The Cenotaph, attended by hundreds, was cancelled this year due to the COVID 19 lockdown and instead took place on church grounds. St. Yeghiche Armenian Church, Cranley Gardens, South Kensington, London, UK. April 24, 2020. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1 and Lumix S Pro 16-35mm f4.0 lens.
Nominee in People. (L-R) Rebekah Jones (as The Grand Duchess) and Jessica Cale (as Susan) getting ready in the dressing room. Bernstein and Berkeley Double Bill by the Royal College of Music Opera Studio. Royal College of Music, Prince Consort Road, London, UK. July 01, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix G9 and Leica DG 10-25mm Vario-Summilux lens.
Nominee in Portrait. Eunsley Park, award-winning British, South Korean violinist, with a Lorenzo Storioni violin, from the 1800s (from the Beare’s International Violin Society). Walkway by a construction site, Ealing, London, UK. July 29, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1 and Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens.
Nominee in Portrait. Fashion designer and independent British luxury brand, Joshua Kane, in his flagship store at 68 Great Portland Street, London, UK. July 23, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1R and Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8.
Nominee in Sport. The horses are cooled down with water after the match. King Power Gold Cup polo match between Emlor and Murus Sanctus. Cowdray Park Polo Club, Ambersham & Brooks Field Grounds, Selham, West Sussex. July 10, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1R and Lumix S Pro 24-70mm f2.8 lens.
Nominee in Sport. Members of Team GB Fencing and other athletes training at the Leon Paul Fencing Centre, 19 Garrick Industrial Centre, Irving Way, London, UK. November 05, 2019. Photo: Edmond Terakopian. Shot on a Lumix S1R and Lumix S Pro 50mm f1.4 lens.

All the photographs were naturally shot in raw format. These Lumix RW2 files (from the S1, S1R and G9) were then edited, captioned and processed in Adobe Lightroom. The monochrome conversions were then finished in Exposure Software‘s Exposure X5.

The AMAHORO Generation

the youth of Rwanda talk peace

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates.  Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates. Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Savagery took over the mind, they went out hunting as kindred spirits, they became a ferocious barbaric species. They were the Interahamwe, the infamous killers of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. They were also the youth of the nation.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child's white sock - the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda,  June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child’s white sock – the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda, June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Two decades on victim and perpetrator are still coping with the aftermath of the 100 days the world chose to ignore.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Born during the genocide era, Rwandan’s youth speak of their aspirations, their hope for peace in the aftermath of a brutal war that fractured their nation. They are the generation that wants to be acknowledged as Rwandese, united in purpose, eliminating historical tribal labels of Hutu and Tutsi. They want their legacy to be known as the Amahoro generation, the peace brokers; where the youth of their parent’s generation were the brutal warriors.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

Amahoro, means peace; it is the youth’s anchor to pursue their destiny.

To mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide and to coincide with the UN International Day of Peace on 21 September, International Alert present The Amahoro Generation: The youth of Rwanda talk peace.

The exhibition, by award-winning photojournalist Carol Allen-Storey, documents the stories of young people born amid the horrors of the Rwandan genocide, and their hopes for ‘amahoro’ – peace. It is an ideal rooted in the wisdom that without peace, there is no future. “Peace unifies,” says Angelique, aged 21 from Gatumba. “Without peace, people remain divided.”

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

“I was struck by the collective view of these young people that they must ensure there is never another genocide – and to do so, learn to forgive and fuel their energy into building a united and prosperous country,” says photographer Carol Allen-Storey.

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert  and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The outdoor exhibition, “The Amahoro Generation”, is on display from the 18th of September to the 2nd of October 2014 (now extended to the 2nd of November 2014; see addendum below) on the South Bank in London at The Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walkway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London SE1 9PP and is free to attend.

Addendum: Some fantastic news; the Amahoro exhibition has been extended for anther 4 weeks. The South Bank have said that responses have been phenomanal and they requested an extended run. The exhibition has been moved in the court yard between OXO Tower and the Barge House and is on until the 2nd of November 2014.

Earlier this year, Carol spent a month in Rwanda, travelling across the country with her Canon 5D MkII cameras documenting the commemoration and interviewing the youth. The exhibition was printed by built by Standard8, designed by Stuart Smith and post produced by Edmond Terakopian.

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Fractured Lives Exhibition

Exhibition by Photojournalist Carol Allen Storey

Fractured Lives is a photographic and multimedia project illustrating the struggles faced by Rwandan citizens rebuilding their lives after the 1994 genocide. The exhibition is at the SW1 Gallery, Cardinal Place (Roof Garden) off Victoria Street in London, and runs until October 12th (check opening times of the gallery before making a trip).

Carol Allen Storey talking about one of her images.

After the private view, a colleague takes in the impact of the imagery.

The project was shot by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert and documents the lives of survivors, ex-combatants and ex-prisoners as they build their communities and reconcile.

Eleneus who did the voice over for the film of the project.

L-R: Photographers Edmond Terakopian, Carol Allen Storey and Joth Shakerley.

The private view of Fractured Lives by Carol Allen Storey at the SW1 Gallery. All Photos: © Edmond Terakopian

I’m proud to say that I have been involved in all the image processing for the project, as well as creating a multimedia piece using these powerful photographs, stories told by the subjects, local music and a voice over. You can view this film below.

It’s an exhibition I highly recommend, so don’t miss it.

Fractured Lives from Edmond Terakopian on Vimeo.