IPA Honourable Mentions

Four Honourable Mentions In the International Photography Awards

Images taken from the IPA website.

Images taken from the IPA website.

Thrilled to share some good news! Three of my images and one video have all received Honourable Mentions in the IPAs ahead of the final announcement on November 2nd.

Here are the images and video honoured by the IPA:

Sunset run,  This image was shot on an Olympus OM-D E-M1 camera and Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm f1.8 lens. Margate Sands, Kent. April 15, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Sunset run, This image was shot on an Olympus OM-D E-M1 camera and Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm f1.8 lens. Margate Sands, Kent. April 15, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A magical London sunset. This image was shot on a Leica M9 and Leica 28mm Summicron lens. May 21, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A magical London sunset. This image was shot on a Leica M9 and Leica 28mm Summicron lens. May 21, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Sunset over west London. This image was shot on a Fujifilm X100s. April 29, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Sunset over west London. This image was shot on a Fujifilm X100s. April 29, 2014. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

 

The AMAHORO Generation

the youth of Rwanda talk peace

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates.  Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Orphan at the age of 1 month when both her parents were butchered during the genocide, Miraculously Germaine Mukagasana survived because a neighbor rescued her. She recentlyattended a beauty school sponsored by International Alert but now finds it difficult to secure employment because she does not have the funds for an internship, a common custom for graduates. Perched on her bed tented by mosquito netting she shines with optimism. She said: “Peace means happiness” Kimironko, Rwanda, May 26, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey

Savagery took over the mind, they went out hunting as kindred spirits, they became a ferocious barbaric species. They were the Interahamwe, the infamous killers of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. They were also the youth of the nation.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child's white sock - the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda,  June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

The Ntarama Church is the site where some of the most brutal killings of the 1994 Rwandan genocide took place. The church at Ntarama was seen as a safe place by almost 5000 people, many of whom were women and children and who went there for sanctuary. But Ntarama was not a safe place. The victims of the genocide remain there, their bones still strewn with lifeless chaos where they fell over 20 years ago. Their belongings cover the floor; clothes, suitcases, a child’s white sock – the last remnants of a desperate flight for life. Ntarama Memorial Church, Ntarama, Rwanda, June 1, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Two decades on victim and perpetrator are still coping with the aftermath of the 100 days the world chose to ignore.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Portrait of Jeanne Unutomi, student at the STAR Secondary School, 20 years old, defining Amahoro, Peace. Masaka, Rwanda, June 6, 2014. Photo: Carol Allen-Storey.

Born during the genocide era, Rwandan’s youth speak of their aspirations, their hope for peace in the aftermath of a brutal war that fractured their nation. They are the generation that wants to be acknowledged as Rwandese, united in purpose, eliminating historical tribal labels of Hutu and Tutsi. They want their legacy to be known as the Amahoro generation, the peace brokers; where the youth of their parent’s generation were the brutal warriors.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

The Kigali School in Nyanga, a remote region in Rwanda was formed less than a year ago and boasts more than 50 members. Gathered together the students dialogue about the causes of the genocide,and the importance of creating a mind-set of being a united nation, not a divided tribe which fueled the hatred between Hutu and Tutsi. There were many definitions of peace but a universal theme stated was: “Peace means respect”. Nyange, Rwanda, May 29 2014. Photo: Carol Allen Storey.

Amahoro, means peace; it is the youth’s anchor to pursue their destiny.

To mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide and to coincide with the UN International Day of Peace on 21 September, International Alert present The Amahoro Generation: The youth of Rwanda talk peace.

The exhibition, by award-winning photojournalist Carol Allen-Storey, documents the stories of young people born amid the horrors of the Rwandan genocide, and their hopes for ‘amahoro’ – peace. It is an ideal rooted in the wisdom that without peace, there is no future. “Peace unifies,” says Angelique, aged 21 from Gatumba. “Without peace, people remain divided.”

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey (pictured) for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

“I was struck by the collective view of these young people that they must ensure there is never another genocide – and to do so, learn to forgive and fuel their energy into building a united and prosperous country,” says photographer Carol Allen-Storey.

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert  and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Dan Smith, Secretary General of International Alert and Carol Allen Storey. The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The outdoor exhibition, “The Amahoro Generation”, is on display from the 18th of September to the 2nd of October 2014 on the South Bank in London at The Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walkway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London SE1 9PP and is free to attend.

Earlier this year, Carol spent a month in Rwanda, travelling across the country with her Canon 5D MkII cameras documenting the commemoration and interviewing the youth. The exhibition was printed by built by Standard8, designed by Stuart Smith and post produced by Edmond Terakopian.

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Amahoro Generation by Carol Allen Storey for International Alert. The outdoor exhibition is at the Bernie Spain Gardens, Riverside Walksway (by Oxo Tower Wharf), South Bank, London. September 18, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Taylor Wessing Portrait Award 2014

My Six Portraits

It’s that time of year (well, a few weeks ago now!) when the Taylor Wessing Portrait Award shortlist is announced and sadly, I didn’t make the shortlist. However, friends ask to see the images I entered, so thought to share them far and wide.

The good news though is that several colleagues have been selected and for the first time in years, I’m really looking forward to the exhibition and the announcement of the winning image.

Gordon Ramsay's Union Street Cafe, 47-51 Great Suffolk Street, Southwark, London SE1.  Gordon Ramsay at the restaurant.  August 30, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Gordon Ramsay’s Union Street Cafe, 47-51 Great Suffolk Street, Southwark, London SE1. Gordon Ramsay at the restaurant. August 30, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Magnum photographer René Burri at his book signing in the Photographers' Gallery book shop, Ramillies Street, London. April 24, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Magnum photographer René Burri at his book signing in the Photographers’ Gallery book shop, Ramillies Street, London. April 24, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Portrait of a model. Olympus OM-D E-M1 Test Shot with the Olympus 75mm f1.8 lens.  Castle Leslie, Glaslough, Ireland. September 10, 2013. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Portrait of a model. Olympus OM-D E-M1 Test Shot with the Olympus 75mm f1.8 lens. Castle Leslie, Glaslough, Ireland. September 10, 2013. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A portrait of former MP and Minister Tony McNulty, who is hoping to stand again as an MP.. London.  September 20, 2013. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A portrait of former MP and Minister Tony McNulty, who is hoping to stand again as an MP.. London. September 20, 2013. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Andrea Feczko (American TV Presenter and digital content creator. www.andreafeczko.com), on Santa Monica beach. LA, USA. January 14, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Andrea Feczko (American TV Presenter and digital content creator. http://www.andreafeczko.com), on Santa Monica beach. LA, USA. January 14, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Harrow and Wembley Society of Model Engineers, Roxbourne Park Railway, Field End Road, Ruislip, Middlesex. A driver waits for passengers on his locomotive. April 02, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Harrow and Wembley Society of Model Engineers, Roxbourne Park Railway, Field End Road, Ruislip, Middlesex. A driver waits for passengers on his locomotive. April 02, 2014. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Do you have a favourite image? Would love to know your thoughts!

My Friend Neil

A Tribute To Neil Patience

It’s with immense sadness that I share the unjust news that my friend Neil Patience passed away yesterday evening (August 20th, 2014). I’ve only known Neil for just over four years; it began as a professional relationship when he reached out to discuss DSLR video. It was a collaboration of photographer turned film maker and a video editor at the top of his game; he was always looking to innovate and move forward with technological changes; a change which brought many photographers to also shooting video.

Neil Patience wearing his "Mankini" T-shirt (designed by me as a joke). Kew Grill, Kew. October 22, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Neil Patience wearing his “Mankini” T-shirt (designed by me as a joke). Kew Grill, Kew. October 22, 2013. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Very quickly though, in fact from Neil’s second email to me, I realised what a man of quality he was; funny, professional, honest and generous, and that I was going to really like him. Sure enough, I’m proud to say we became friends and I was introduced to his amazing family; Tara and little Millie, his sister Sara, along with his great circle of friends.

RNOH behind the scenes shots for filming of the fund raising film. Operating Theatre 4 with Prof Tim Briggs. Neil Patience prepares the professor for the interview. September 21, 2011. Photo: Nicola Taylor

RNOH behind the scenes shots for filming of the fund raising film. Operating Theatre 4 with Prof Tim Briggs. Neil Patience prepares the professor for the interview. September 21, 2011. Photo: Nicola Taylor

Our biggest collaboration, and a project of which I am so very proud was making a fund raising film for the RNOH (Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital). The hospital and an amazing surgeon, Professor Tim Briggs, had saved his life around ten years ago and Neil was keen to give back, donating his time for producing, co-directong and editing the film as his thank you. We were both very proud to screen the film at it’s premiere at St James’s Palace at an event hosted by the hospital’s patron, HRH Prince Andrew. I urge you to watch the film and go and make a small donation to the hospital charity. It will make Neil happy to know you helped.

Watching Neil video editing was like watching a concert pianist in full swing. His hands and fingers moving with speed and grace over the timeline, constructing narrative, making cuts, laying down audio and making it all flow and move like the work of the best composers. I learnt so much by spending a few days in the editing suite with Neil. A true master of his craft; an editor and colourist, and an amazingly generous and patient teacher.

Behind the scenes photographs of the filming of the appeal film. Producer and editor Neil Patience and ex-patient Phil Packer. RNOH, Stanmore. Photo: Nicola Taylor

Behind the scenes photographs of the filming of the appeal film. Producer and editor Neil Patience and ex-patient Phil Packer. RNOH, Stanmore. Photo: Nicola Taylor

Neil showed me what spirit was; the last ten years hadn’t been easy and even more so the last year and a half, had been particularly cruel to him. He never let this bother him, instead rising above it all and just moving forwards, great sense of humour intact. Neil was also completely selfless; laying in bed, a couple of days before losing consciousness, he turned to me and asked what I was going to do now; I knew he meant now that he will no longer be around. He was so concerned, out of compassion and love for what we did, that our collaboration, TAP TV would not cope. It will miss your immense talent my friend and will never be the same, but don’t worry about that :-)

Editing the fund raising video for RNOH at New Day Pictures' editing suite in Surrey. Assistant Nicola Taylor and video editor Neil Patience at work.  November 08, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Editing the fund raising video for RNOH at New Day Pictures’ editing suite in Surrey. Assistant Nicola Taylor and video editor Neil Patience at work. November 08, 2011. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Having shed my tears over Neil leaving this world far too early, for he had projects and plans in mind, living life to the full, fighting and showing courage and determination, my tears and deep condolences go to his daughter Millie, wife Tara and sister Sara, followed by his circle of friends with whom he shared so many adventures.

I will miss you chief.

Addendum:

The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Appeal have written this wonderful tribute for Neil.

David Burnett; 50 Years Of Photography

Wacom Intuos Pro Tablet Review

Wacom Intuos 5 Touch Medium TABLET (now called the Intuos Pro)

To Tablet Or Not To Tablet; Long Term Review
The Wacom Intuos Pro family of tablets. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos Pro family of tablets. Photo: ©Wacom

I’ve been a user of Wacom tablets for many years now. I have had an Intuos 2 and Intuos 3. With the introduction of a “touch” surface, I was intrigues so borrowed the new Intuos 5 Touch Medium with wireless adapter for a long term review from Wacom.

Editing "1 Sixpence 1 Play" using FCP X and a Wacom Intuos 5 Touch graphic's tablet and calibrated Eizo CG276 monitors. Still frame from video; ©Edmond Terakopian

Editing “1 Sixpence 1 Play” using FCP X and a Wacom Intuos 5 Touch graphic’s tablet and calibrated Eizo CG276 monitors. Still frame from video; ©Edmond Terakopian

The review didn’t start off too well though. The early software drivers on the Mac weren’t very stable and regardless of wether I was in tethered mode (USB) or wireless (using a wireless USB adapter), the tablet would at some stage during the working day disappear and eventually I just gave up and went back to using the Apple Trackpad on my Mac Pro and Intuos 3, waiting for updates to the software.

The Wacom Intuos Pro small tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos Pro small tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

During a large edit on a big project (around a year ago), I developed a serious wrist pain and decided it was time to get the Wacom Intuos 5 out again. My only issue with using my Intuos 3 all the time is that I’m now so used to the gesture control in the Mac OS that having only a pen or the Wacom mouse is often counter productive. I decided to have a look at the Intuos 5 again and thankfully there was updated software. I updated and switched off the Apple Trackpad and went to the Wacom. Glad to report that the drivers are now solid and there are no more problems.

The Wacom Intuos Pro medium tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos Pro medium tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

The huge positive thing about the Intuos 5 is the fact that it is also a touch pad with gesture control too; the name is kind of a clue here. Some learning is needed to master a few new movements but the system works well; so well that I’ve stuck with it solidly since, without issue. My beloved Apple Trackpad has been tucked away in a cupboard since. There’s also fully customisable control in the way of “ExpressKeys” and added control with the Touch Ring.

Having used it with Aperture, Lightroom, Capture One, Photoshop as well as FCP X on some major projects, several of which have gone on to win awards, the combination of pen and touch not only works extremely well, but is also much kinder physically and doesn’t cause the fatigue or pain that can be associated with heavy mouse or trackpad use. For my general computing, I just use the tablet as a touch device.

The Wacom Intuos Pro medium tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos Pro medium tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

One huge advantage with the pen is also the ability to be much more accurate. Using brushes or moving sliders incrementally can be done with pinpoint accuracy. On top of this, the free flowing pen is suited towards artistic expression, so things like burning in or dodging is a breeze and more akin to the expressiveness one would show in a traditional darkroom. Naturally for the artist, there is no better tool, so if you draw, paint or do graphical design and for some reason haven’t tried a Wacom, just do – you won’t regret it. One thing I can pretty much guarantee is that within weeks of use of a Wacom, you will wonder how you managed without it.

The only gripe I have is the touch surface doesn’t cover the entire tablet and is within a designated area, which is incidentally, clearly marked and roughly around 85% of the surface area. I occasionally find myself just outside the bottom of the area and it’s frustrating as it can lead to errors when using the tablet as a trackpad. One does get used to it, and there are so many positives, that for me, it’s not a deal breaker. I do hope though that Wacom can make the next model touch capable over the entire surface.

Some thoughts on which size; as I use dual monitors at my office, I have always opted for the A4 size in the past, now called the Medium. The larger surface area allows for great control and accuracy when working on small areas (like retouching dust). I think anyone who works on a single screen or works just on a laptop will probably find the Small size to be more than capable. As always though, the best thing is to find your nearest stockist and go and have a try to see what suits you best. Also, for those who have never tried a tablet before, at first it will feel slightly alien the first day; trust me, just persevere as it will revolutionise the way you interact with your computer.

Faster working, pain free use, accurate and versatile with both pen and touch. With the maturing of the software, this is a must have for anyone who spends a lot of time photo, video or audio editing. I can’t recommend this highly enough; your work will improve and your wrist will thank you. Having just sold my Intuos 3 tablet, pen and mouse, I shall be purchasing my own Intuos 5 Touch Medium soon!

The Wacom Intuos 5 family of tablets. As you can see, the new Pro series look almost identical. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos 5 family of tablets. As you can see, the new Pro series look almost identical. Photo: ©Wacom

NB – Since beginning this long term review, the model naming has changed and the Intuos 5 range is now called the Intuos Pro. As far as differences between the unit, they are practically identical with some minor cosmetic differences and a slightly different surface coating. Also, the Pro now comes with the wireless kit as standard (although you can also use a USB connection instead).

On a related issue, as I’m often on the road with my MacBook Pro or 11” MacBook Air, either on assignment, teaching workshops or giving presentations, I decided to get a smaller tablet for mobile use. I opted for the Intuos Pen and Touch in the small size, which is working out well too. Not up to the feel of the Intuos 5, which is a professional grade piece of equipment, but it does work well on the road. One thing’s for sure though; once funds allow, I’ll almost definitely be upgrading that to the small size Intuos Pro Touch.

The Wacom Intuos small tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

The Wacom Intuos small tablet. Photo: ©Wacom

To see the Wacom in action, you can jump to 05:28 where you can see it being used with FCP X to edit our film “1 Sixpence 1 Play“:

Keeping Your Printer Up & Running

Tips For The Large Format Printer User

Allow me to paint you a picture; I had allocated a day in my diary to make some prints on my superb Canon iPF6300 (although this post will be of relevance to any large format printer user). I had a few print orders and also needed to make six A1 sized prints to enter into the Taylor Wessing Portrait Award.

A montage on the Canon iPF6300 large format printer. Replacing inks and nozzle check calibration print after installing new print heads. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A montage on the Canon iPF6300 large format printer. Replacing inks and nozzle check calibration print after installing new print heads. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

On the day set aside for making the prints, I switched on the printer and started collating the images on my Mac, ready to print. Well, after having not made a print for a few months, the machine sprang into action, going through it’s warming up procedures, agitating inks, moving print heads and so on. Alas I was at the end of this robotic dance, I was greeted with the error code informing the print heads need to be replaced. Now this is a costly process, but even more annoying is the fact that I don’t keep spares. I have lots of paper and ink at all times, just not spare print heads and often as also needed, the maintenance cartridge. Panic and annoyance set in as there was a deadline looming and I had other projects on the go.

Off to Google to search for the cheapest place I can source print heads and as crucially, a place that can deliver them the next day. My search concluded with a company I hadn’t used before; they were great on price, had stock and crucially promised next day delivery. The company was the iPF Store.

I decided to make a call to double check the stock and delivery situation and was put through to an extremely helpful and knowledgeable chap called Andy. The two print heads and maintenance cartridge I needed were indeed in stock and would definitely be delivered the next day. A sigh of relief! I carried on chatting about the print head issue as it felt to me that they had seized up prematurely. Andy informed me that indeed it is a problem for the low volume print maker. These printers are designed to work at the print houses and studios were they are in use daily. In my case, the inactivity had been the issue and caused the print heads to have a shorter life span. Being outside of the Canon one year warranty on them, they had to be changed.

My chat with Andy resulted in a list of other tips, so what better than to share them?!

Andy From The iPF Store, Top Five Tips

1)    Always leave the printer turned on – It monitors the heads, does a very low level clean when needed to keep the nozzles wet to stop them drying out. Dry and blocked nozzles require additional power cleanses (uses more ink). In more extreme cases when the block cannot be cleaned, the heads fail completely so new ones are required.

2)    Achieve the highest possible graduations by working in 16bit RGB and print using the Adobe Photoshop Plugin.

3)    Have a colour calibrated workflow, calibrating your screen and make custom print profiles for papers that don’t have them for your printer. Keeps your printer in constant colour control.

4)    Use the Canon Media Config Tool to add your own custom medias to the standard Canon library, and ensure the best print quality.

5)    Allow a minimum of one hour for the ink to dry down before applying any finishing such as varnish or laminate.

I agree fully with the points raised, although I didn’t know of the first point, which is what landed me in this predicament!

An A1 size print of chef Gordon Ramsay, printed on the Canon iPF6300 on Canon photo satin paper. The image was shot using this Leica M (Type 240) and 50mm Noctilux ASPH. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

An A1 size print of chef Gordon Ramsay, printed on the Canon iPF6300 on Canon photo satin paper. The image was shot using this Leica M (Type 240) and 50mm Noctilux ASPH. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Well, my print heads and maintenance cartridge arrived before lunchtime the next day and I managed to make all my prints (which have found new homes in London, Paris and New York) and also made the six prints for the competition. Thanks Andy :-)

The links:

iPF Store: http://www.ipfstore.co.uk

Their parent company; Pro Print Solutions: http://www.proprintsolutions.co.uk