RODELink Review

My Review Of The RØDELink Filmmaker Kit

The new Rodelink wireless setup. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The new Rodelink wireless setup. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Easy. That’s the surprise when you first setup the new RODELink. So easy to setup and start shooting with. One button pairing, digital wireless and a distance of up to 100 meters.

The RodeLink Film Maker Kit on my Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II. May 16, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The RodeLink Film Maker Kit on my Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II. May 16, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Rode’s first wireless system works a treat; fast to get going with and great audio too. The Filmmaker Kit comes with a transmitter receiver, the excellent Rode Lavalier mic and also a minijack cable for attaching the receiver to your camera or audio recorder.

New Rode VideoMic Pro

Rode VideoMic Pro Review

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

My favourite hotshoe shotgun microphone has had a significant update. The microphone capsule has been upgraded, giving a lower noise floor and higher sensitivity. Usability wise, the suspension mount has been changed and now has the superb Lyre shock mount made by Rycote.

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The changes have made a favourite mic of mine better, especially with the sturdier new Rycote mount, meaning the whole microphone is much more durable and absolutely ready for use in the field.

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The new Rode VideoMic Pro incorporating a built-in Lyre suspension mount by Rycote. May 19, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Olympus Magazine Interview – May 2015

10 Page Interview

Olympus Magazine May 2015 Front

Thrilled to share that this month’s Olympus Magazine has a 10 page interview with me about my photography and video work.

You can get your free online copy HERE.

Alternatively, you can download a PDF of just the 10 page interview HERE.

Photoshoot with model Jordan Ebbitt. London. April 10, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A portrait of Jordan Ebbitt. London. April 10, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Tips On How Not To Annoy Professional Photographers

Things To Avoid

L-R: Edmond Terakopian and Ian Berry having a chat about all things photographic London.  January 22, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant

L-R: Edmond Terakopian and Ian Berry having a chat about all things photographic. London. January 22, 2015. Photo: Neil Buchan-Grant

1- Do not say “Great capture”. So annoying. Calling it a good photograph, shot or picture is all that’s needed.

2- Do not say “wow, I bet you get really nice pictures with that camera”. The camera doesn’t make the photographs; the photographer does. It’s just like you wouldn’t compliment a writer on their choice of word processor or a chef on their choice of pan.

3- Do not say things like “nice bokeh”! It’s not a compliment to make a comment on the out of focus areas on a picture; probably better to concentrate on the actual subject in the picture. If you really like how the lens renders out of focus detail (bokeh) write to the manufacturer and lens designer. They designed it and so, deserve your praise.

4- “I could’ve done that if I was there”. Well, being there at the right time is half the skill; then it’s making it happen in camera. Trust me, it’s not that easy when everything’s going down.

…perhaps most importantly:

5- Respect your copyright and don’t give away your pictures for free (or for ridiculously low pay. Remember, if it’s worth publishing, it’s worth paying for). You’re ruining an entire industry when you do this. Imagine if in your line of work a hobbyist turned up and started working for free. You would soon not have a job.

Feel free to add to this list in the comments below and please do share this post around :-) Thanks.

Edmond Terakopian at the new Wembley Stadium, covering the first football game after it's opening. Photo: Stuart Emmerson

Edmond Terakopian at the new Wembley Stadium, covering the first football game after its opening. Photo: Stuart Emmerson

The Power Of A Photograph

Our Own Personal Histories

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian (far left) in the back of a lorry delivering supplies to the front line in Martakert, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

The power of the photograph never ceases to amaze me. A good friend, the talented Hakob Berberyan (also known as Hakber), a photojournalist and sports photographer based in Armenia, has over the last two days found some pictures he took of me in Karabakh, back in 1994.

Receiving these images out of the blue, has taken me on a journey through time. A reflection on the sadness of war, meeting the most amazing people manning the trenches in Martakert, the amazing spirit of ordinary people in villages thrown into a conflict zone, the value of friendship and camaraderie. The humbling feeling of a people so thankful that someone had come to photograph and thus document what they were going through.

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

Edmond Terakopian in Shushi, Karabakh. August 1994. Photo: Hakob Berberyan

A cocktail of feelings and thoughts, and a montage of remembered images, some photographed and some seen, a remembrance of youth and wonder, all brought about by seeing a photograph. Amazing.

Thank You

The Photography Show 2015

The Olympus Seminar Room time table at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

The Olympus Seminar Room time table at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

A word of thanks to everyone who made The Photography Show special. I’m very grateful that many of you came to my talks at the Olympus Seminar Room every day. Some great Q&A and interesting conversations were had and I’m most thankful.

Olympus Seminar Room

Edmond Terakopian giving a talk at The Olympus Seminar Room at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Rob J Hugh

Edmond Terakopian giving a talk at The Olympus Seminar Room at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Rob J Hugh

A big word of thanks also to all who came to my two talks at The Film Makers Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. Talking of which, great to see so many friends, colleagues and customers, old and new, come and visit the stand, check out some new bags, tripods and lighting kit and have such great conversations.

"Essentials In Documentary Film Making" talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

“Essentials In Documentary Film Making” talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

"Essentials In Documentary Film Making" talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. Showing how I pack my Rode microphones, Rycote accessories and other video necessities into my Think Tank Photo Airport Accelerator. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

“Essentials In Documentary Film Making” talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. Showing how I pack my Rode microphones, Rycote accessories and other video necessities into my Think Tank Photo Airport Accelerator. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

"Essentials In Documentary Film Making" talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

“Essentials In Documentary Film Making” talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

"Essentials In Documentary Film Making" talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. Showing "1 Sixpence 1 Play", shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M1. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

“Essentials In Documentary Film Making” talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. Showing “1 Sixpence 1 Play”, shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M1. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

"Essentials In Documentary Film Making" talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. My laptop bag, a blue Think Tank Photo Retrospective 13L can be seen by the podium. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

“Essentials In Documentary Film Making” talk by Edmond Terakopian at the Filmmaker Theatre on behalf of Snapper Stuff. My laptop bag, a blue Think Tank Photo Retrospective 13L can be seen by the podium. The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 23, 2015. Photo: Freia Turland

It was great to see my choice in monitors, the great folks at Eizo, use my short film Taxi Driver, shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II to show just how great these monitors are.

Taxi Driver, shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II being shown on the Eizo UK stand at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Taxi Driver, shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II being shown on the Eizo UK stand at The Photography Show, NEC, Birmingham. March 21, 2015. Photo: Edmond Terakopian

Naturally, also a big word of thanks to the teams at Olympus, Snapper Stuff and Eizo, along with many friends throughout the trade, who made the show fun; it’s always good to catch up and say hi, even if in some cases it’s annually!

Here’s looking forward to The Photography Show in 2016!

Olympus 40MP High Res RAW Plugin

New RAW Plug-in For OM-D E-M5 Mark II High Res Mode

Olympus High Res Shot Raw File Photoshop Plugin

Some great news for Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II owners. We now have a new Photoshop plug-in to allow processing of these astonishing 40MP high resolution images from the raw file. Although relatively simple in interface, it allows the all important setting of white balance and also sharpening at the raw file stage.

A rare Ferrari 288 GTO built in 1985 with only 883 miles on the clock. It is valued at £2,000,000 and available from H.R. Owen in South Kensington, London. Image shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 II, using the multi shot sensor shift facility, creating a 40 megapixel image. January 30, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

A rare Ferrari 288 GTO built in 1985 with only 883 miles on the clock. It is valued at £2,000,000 and available from H.R. Owen in South Kensington, London. Image shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 II, using the multi shot sensor shift facility, creating a 40 megapixel image. January 30, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

The Olympus High Res Shot Raw File Photoshop Plug-in can be downloaded HERE and the manual is available HERE.

The image of the Ferrari GTO was processed using this plugin. No other processing was done in Photoshop. The image was then sent to Alienskin’s Exposure 7 where I applied a 50% faded and subtle Kodachrome 64 preset. Finally the image had it’s final sharpening done in Nik Software’s Sharpener Pro.

You can view my jpegs from this shoot in my Flickr album.

Detail Shot - A rare Ferrari 288 GTO built in 1985 with only 883 miles on the clock. It is valued at £2,000,000 and available from H.R. Owen in South Kensington, London. Image shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 II, using the multi shot sensor shift facility, creating a 40 megapixel image. January 30, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian

Detail Shot – A rare Ferrari 288 GTO built in 1985 with only 883 miles on the clock. It is valued at £2,000,000 and available from H.R. Owen in South Kensington, London. Image shot on the Olympus OM-D E-M5 II, using the multi shot sensor shift facility, creating a 40 megapixel image. January 30, 2015. Photo: ©Edmond Terakopian