Judges-007[1]

The photograph in question. The GREAT campaign tried to get this picture for free, stating that they had a tight budget and could not pay. The budget for the campaign is £55M. Photo: ©Shaun Curry

The photograph in question. The GREAT campaign tried to get this picture for free, stating that they had a tight budget and could not pay. The budget for the campaign is £55M. Photo: ©Shaun Curry

2 responses to “Judges-007[1]

  1. As a photographer i can understand that you never work for free. But on the other hand, the Photograph in question is NOT worth £15-20,000 as stated! Its a single snap shot of people in wigs walking, They could have found 10000 photographers in london who could shoot this exact image and commisioned the whole day for £500 with all images included and been honoured to get the job. Purchase of copyright for 1 image of this subject shouldnt be more than £1000. Its shocking to think someone would try and charge that much for a simple spontaeneous image like this.

    • Firstly, it’s not an honour to be lied to and conned into giving away pictures for free. Nor is it an honour to be vastly under paid. Secondly, clearly you have no concept of image licensing or proper day rates; this is fine as we don’t all know everything, but might I suggest you look into photographers’ day rates for advertising or look at image pricing for licensing the image with the requirements made by the GREAT campaign? You can look at Photoshelter, Alamy or Getty as a start to get an idea. Your disparaging comments about the photograph in question is well out of order, but that aside, image licensing has nothing to do with the aesthetic value of an image, how complicated it was to light or to take, if it was a landscape picture that took a week to take because of bad light, if it was in a studio and lit with a complex rig and three assistants, a press assignment (as in this case) or a street moment captured – it could even be an out of focus snapshot of the pavement taken on a disposable plastic lensed camera. It’s image licensing, full stop. If the image is particularly unique, rare or a one off, then the price increases from the point of the standard image pricing. The prices I have quoted in my piece are all standard image pricing. I would have gladly explained all of this to you. Google can also help. I tend to research things before commenting publicly on matters I don’t understand; perhaps this might be useful for you too?

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